The Normal Personality: A New Way of Thinking about People

The Normal Personality A New Way of Thinking about People Many Psychologists regard personality and mental illness as closely related The shadow of Freudian analysis looms over modern psychopathology driving many psychologists to try to understand their cli

  • Title: The Normal Personality: A New Way of Thinking about People
  • Author: Steven Reiss
  • ISBN: 9780521881067
  • Page: 168
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Many Psychologists regard personality and mental illness as closely related The shadow of Freudian analysis looms over modern psychopathology, driving many psychologists to try to understand their clients personal troubles and personalities using constructs developed to study mental illness They believe that dark, unconscious mental forces that originated in childhood cMany Psychologists regard personality and mental illness as closely related The shadow of Freudian analysis looms over modern psychopathology, driving many psychologists to try to understand their clients personal troubles and personalities using constructs developed to study mental illness They believe that dark, unconscious mental forces that originated in childhood cause personality traits, personal troubles, and mental illnesses Steven Reiss thinks problems are a normal part of life In The Normal Personality, Reiss argues that human beings are naturally intolerant of people who express values significantly different from their own Because of this intolerance, psychologists and psychiatrists sometimes confuse individuality with abnormality and thus over diagnose disorders Reiss shows how normal motives, not anxiety or traumatic childhood experiences, underlie many personality and relationship problems, such as divorce, infidelity, combativeness, workaholism, loneliness, authoritarianism, weak leadership styles, perfectionism, underachievement, arrogance, extravagance, stuffed shirt ism, disloyalty, disorganization, and overanxiety Based on a series of scientific studies, this book advances an original scientific theory of psychological needs, values, and personality traits Reiss shows how different points on motivational arc produce different personality traits and values He also shows how knowledge of psychological needs and values can be applied in counseling individuals and couples The author describes new, powerful methods of assessing and predicting motivated behavior in natural environments including corporations, schools, and relationships.

    One thought on “The Normal Personality: A New Way of Thinking about People”

    1. One of psychology’s greatest shortcomings is that, although typically positioned as such, it is not a science. In fact, psychology is, by and large, best guess. What Steven Reiss does in “The Normal Personality” is cast aside the causational model of unconscious drives—a “best guess” model generally unsupported by empirical evidence—suggested by Freudian psychodynamic theory and the general misapplication of Fechner’s perspectives on psychology, commonly known as Fechner’s Law. [...]

    2. Although Steven Reiss doesn't really go into the details of personality per se, he does outline a new and profoundly exciting way of thinking about personality in general. Too much of personality research has focussed on 'abnormality' and this is the first time since The Big Five model of personality, that someone has come up with an easy and clear new model. For obvious reasons Reiss cites his own work, which is profound, and thereby shows the validity (both face and construct) and reliability [...]

    3. The book claims to make a strong argument for a normal approach to personality as against the more commonly held pathological view. The idea is great, but the outcome is not as good as expected.The book appears more or less like an extensive manual of the RMP test. As a reader, reading the description of every trait is not of much interest. Rather, the book should have held consistently to the theme.Where the author does put his ideas across, he explains them well. The illustrations with real li [...]

    4. I'm stunned. Having studied a Psychology module a year ago that included a chapter on personality studies, here is a book all about a theory of personality that I have never heard of.The premise is that personality is the result of how 16 universal motivations - which everyone has to varying extent - interact. The motivations that are very strong (or very weak) have a large effect on personality.Reiss does a good job of defending his theory, which is clearly the result of extensive study. He sho [...]

    5. I have not read a lot of other books on personality out there but I found this one quite normalizing (i.e. we all don't have some psychopathology) That said I wonder about the author's methodology when he uses his undergraduate psych. class to test his inventory. I was also concerned by how subjective his classifications seemed to be; I imagine that I might have a different construction of what personality trait fit into one of his 16 categories. His writing was also repetitive. He could have ac [...]

    6. Wydaje mi się, że gdybym wiedział nieco więcej w tym temacie a nie był nowicjuszem w zakresie psychologii motywacji to wystawiłbym książce niższą ocenę. Mam przeczucie, że jest w niej nieco nieuprawnionych tez, ale są one postawione w taki sposób, że w razie czego łatwo byłoby wykazać ich nieprawdziwość. Stopień zakorzenienia w danych empirycznych jest dość mały. Lista 16 motywacji sprawia wrażenie nieco arbitralnej. Zgaduję jednak, że w działach psychologii takich ja [...]

    7. good insights but seriously negative in attitude. also, the author comes off as a little arrogant. I gave it up.

    8. Interesting topic. Tries to break apart what motivates people. Not a simple extrinsic/intrinsic motivation split

    9. I change my mind. After reading about numerous other personality theories out there the 'originality' value of this book simply went down a notch.

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