Martyrs' Crossing

Martyrs Crossing SOPHISTICATED AND SUSPENSEFUL TAUTLY WRITTEN Wilentz knows the world she writes about very well and her descriptions have a solid specificity that lends authority to her fiction The New York Times Bo

  • Title: Martyrs' Crossing
  • Author: Amy Wilentz
  • ISBN: 9780345449832
  • Page: 140
  • Format: Paperback
  • SOPHISTICATED AND SUSPENSEFUL TAUTLY WRITTEN Wilentz knows the world she writes about very well, and her descriptions have a solid specificity that lends authority to her fiction The New York Times Book Review At a closed Israeli checkpoint, Marina, a Palestinian mother, clutches her ailing boy, desperate for access to Jerusalem and its doctors When a young SOPHISTICATED AND SUSPENSEFUL TAUTLY WRITTEN Wilentz knows the world she writes about very well, and her descriptions have a solid specificity that lends authority to her fiction The New York Times Book Review At a closed Israeli checkpoint, Marina, a Palestinian mother, clutches her ailing boy, desperate for access to Jerusalem and its doctors When a young Israeli soldier waits too long before deciding to disobey orders, a martyr is born Thus begins a graceful, painful, illuminating novel of the Middle East Wilentz s prose tugs at the reader The characters are magnetic This is a very human tale of regrets, revenge, and the elusive nature of absolution Entertainment Weekly SO PRECISE, SO STARTLING, SO UNFORGETTABLE These characters are all pawns of history and politics, but Wilentz makes them live Los Angeles Times MAGNIFICENT Wilentz writes with a prose style reminiscent of The New Yorker s highest ambitions crystalline, pure, faultlessly communicative Like the best documentaries, Martyrs Crossing allows us unprecedented access to a little understood and often misrepresented part of the world Chicago Tribune A BRILLIANTLY RESEARCHED MEDIDATION ON THE CRISIS IN THE MIDDLE EAST Martyr s Crossing matches Damascus Gate in the quality of research and the mass of intriguing characters and yet it remains a lean thriller The New York Observer

    One thought on “Martyrs' Crossing”

    1. (2001/311 pages) It took the author three years to write this book, her first novel. It is a book about the crisis in the Middle East, really between Palestinians and Israelis. It is a political book in one sense but really a very human tale of regrets, revenge, and the elusive nature of absolution. The characters are all well developed and her writing is very sophisticated. She was the editor of "The Nation" and truly has an understanding of the situation, and presents these characters in her b [...]

    2. I received this book from for my honest review. This was a difficult story to process. It involves an incident at a checkpoint crossing where a Palestinian boy dies due to delay in allowing him and his Palestinian-American mother to get medical help in Israel. The story is told through multiple viewpoints and there are no victors here. The tragic consequences are felt by all - the mother who is torn between her life with her imprisoned husband there and her father who lives stateside, the young [...]

    3. Desperately sad. Even more so because it's real. Yes, it's a novel and the characters are imagined, but what happens to them happens to Israelis and Palestinians every day. And Amy Wilentz knows what she's writing about -- she was the Jerusalem correspondent for The New Yorker for two years. It is extraordinarily well-written, and is that true rarity: a book about the Palestinian-Israeli conflict that sees the humanity, and the tragedy, on both sides.

    4. FANTASTiCFrom Publishers WeeklyA former Jerusalem correspondent for the New Yorker and 1990 National Book Critics Circle nonfiction nominee, Wilentz supplements a natural storyteller's eye for character with a reporter's grasp of swirling political detail in this complex, haunting debut novel. At a checkpoint in Jerusalem, a beautiful young Palestinian woman begs an Israeli soldier for permission to "cross over" in order to get her two-year-old son to the hospital. The soldier, Lt. Ari Doron, fr [...]

    5. Martyr's Crossing is a well-crafted political novel about our common humanity and what political violence does to individuals. The book's characters are not predictable stereotypes, but rather flesh and blood.Wilentz's political insights are right on. Here's the Palestinian-American grandfather of the toddler who dies at the beginning of the novel, musing on how events can be manipulated: "You find something, something good, something that really sparks the people because it comes from deep down [...]

    6. I read this a while ago, so here's a a plot overview from the site. Definitely worth it.A former Jerusalem correspondent for the New Yorker and 1990 National Book Critics Circle nonfiction nominee, Wilentz supplements a natural storyteller's eye for character with a reporter's grasp of swirling political detail in this complex, haunting debut novel. At a checkpoint in Jerusalem, a beautiful young Palestinian woman begs an Israeli soldier for permission to "cross over" in order to get her two-ye [...]

    7. Martyr's Crossing was just not my book. The relative popularity of the novel strikes me as victory of marketing rather that a reflection of its merits. True, a summary of the central events of the book sound captivating: set against the perennial headline-grabbing backdrop of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Martyr's Crossing expounds upon the broad-reaching consequences of the death of a Palestinian child at an Israeli checkpoint. All the ingredients of a bestselling novel are here--the ripple [...]

    8. Martyrs' Crossing begins at an Israeli checkpoint in Jerusalem. A Palestinian mother seeking medical care for her toddler son is refused entry because her husband has been jailed by the Israelis. The baby dies, and all parties try to use the death for their own purposes. Amy Wilentz's novel pits Palestinians against Israelis, but also each other. The Israelis are of more than one mind as well. New views clash with old as another generation of leaders takes their place. The events unfold with tra [...]

    9. A story rich in human emotion set in contemporary Ramallah & Jerusalem. A Palestinian American who returned to Palestine to marry a Hamas activist watches her son die at a checkpoint as she waits to get clearance to get through to take him to a hospital in Jerusalem. The story of the political & emotional fallout of that tragic event is told from the viewpoint of the mother, her father (a cardiac specialist at Harvard who's also an activist on behalf of Palestinian rights), & the sol [...]

    10. This is a political story with a human touch. A young Palestinian-American woman raised in Cambridge returns to her homeland to marry a Hamas activist, while her academic father watches from the safety of Harvard University with a mixture of pride, guilt and horror as her life spins out of control. Marina's husband is incarcerated in Israel for involvement in a terrorist plot and their toddler dies a needless death while awaiting checkpoint authorization to cross the border to access urgent medi [...]

    11. A Boston-born woman of Palestinian descent has returned to Palestine with her husband, a committed freedom-fighter now jailed by the Israelis. When their two-year-old son dies for lack of medical attention due to an Israeli-enforced border closing that separates him from the hospital, the Palestinians regard him as a martyr, and his death becomes a rallying point for political extremists. But Marina understands that a dead child is only that, not a symbol, not a martyr, only a dead child sadly m [...]

    12. It is hard to describe how such a grim book could be so intriguing or in many ways so beautiful. Painful tragedy besets a Palestinian woman and what follows is both painful and stunning as the we follow each corollary in the aftermath - those who mourn, those who exploit, those who cower and those who seek forgiveness. I gained a great appreciation for the ongoing Palestinian/Israeli conflict in a highly relatable way, and a new sympathy for both sides. A sober and haunting tale which is mostly [...]

    13. Story starts off at a checkpoint where the mother is trying to get her asthmatic son to Haddassa hospital in Jerusalem. Of course the checkpoint is closed and thee child does not get through in time. The Israelis immediately launch a cover up and the Palestinians launch a find the soldier campaign. Marina the mather has a husband who is in Jail. Her father George is critical of the Palestinian AUthority in it's effort to use thee incident for propaganda. The soldier himself feels guilty and so t [...]

    14. A friend of mine (thanks Grace R) told me this was an unbiased book about the Palestinian/Israeli conflict. She was correct. Wilentz was the Jerusalem correspondent for The New Yorker from 1995 to 1997 and I can only assume that she drew the story from that experience. To be able to relate the experience in such an unbiased manner is phenomenal. To understand the impossible snarl of politics and social life and tell it with intense skill and nuance is powerful. Beyond that, I loved the cadence o [...]

    15. I enjoyed the description of how everyone in this story is basically screwed by history. I never felt that I got inside the emotional lives of any of the characters however. Her style reminded me of Dickens where the plot is more primary than the characters themselves. Since its a history I don't know well enough it was good to see inside it.

    16. This book does not provide any easy answers to the Israeli/Palestinian issue, but it certainly makes it more personal. I loved the tension, the characters are so real I highly recommend it. Yes, it is not a spoiler to say a child dies, but that is not what the focus is. I hesitated to pick it up at first for that very reason, but I am SO glad I did.

    17. This book had its ups and downs. It started off being very captivating, then transformed itself into something rather boring after approximately 50 pages. It became interesting again for the last 100 pages. Overall, the characters were intriguing, and they were usually (but not always) believable as well.

    18. This quote, from the book itself, encompasses its' meaning: "Endings do not happen here. Things did not come to a close, even on the rare occasions when they seem to. In the Holy Land, you could haggle for a century or two over and INCH of unusable land, and really MEAN it."A very good read.

    19. Not my usual genre. The first third of the book I was afraid that it was going to be about the political maneuvering that follows tragedy in the Middle East. then it became a story about those affected by the tragedy.

    20. Probably more like 2.5 stars. The concept and topic made me thinka lot. Just took a long time to get through.

    21. Really liked this story of the middle east crisis from individual's perspective, not just politicians' retoric. Eye-opening.

    22. This novel tells the story of an Israeli soldier and a Palestinian woman who meet at a checkpoint, where the woman's child dies. The story is interesting and well-written, but somewhat predictable.

    23. New arthur for me. Well written. Would read her again. Plot deals with politics behind what happens at a checkpoint in Israel. Things are not upfront and clear. Interesting and mind opening.

    24. An interesting example of investing theological and philosophical debate in the skin of characters and human dilemma. It was okay.

    25. Good read. It kept me interested throughout the book without wishing for it to be over. Good plot. I did take to the map to see exactly how it all came together.

    26. I loved this book--and not just because the author is a friend. Anyone looking for insight into the Israel-Palestine conflict will find it here, in beautiful prose, and a gripping story.

    27. The book reminded me of a documentary. It is a window into another culture and part of the world through American eyes.

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