Pretend You're In A War: The Who and the Sixties

Pretend You re In A War The Who and the Sixties A definitive tome for both Who fans and newcomers alike Q MagazinePete Townshend was once asked how he prepared himself for The Who s violent live performances His answer Pretend you re in a war For a

  • Title: Pretend You're In A War: The Who and the Sixties
  • Author: Mark Blake
  • ISBN: 9781781311875
  • Page: 281
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A definitive tome for both Who fans and newcomers alike Q MagazinePete Townshend was once asked how he prepared himself for The Who s violent live performances His answer Pretend you re in a war For a band as prone to furious infighting as it was notorious for acts of auto destructive art this could have served as a motto.Between 1964 and 1969 The Who released s A definitive tome for both Who fans and newcomers alike Q MagazinePete Townshend was once asked how he prepared himself for The Who s violent live performances His answer Pretend you re in a war For a band as prone to furious infighting as it was notorious for acts of auto destructive art this could have served as a motto.Between 1964 and 1969 The Who released some of the most dramatic and confrontational music of the decade, including I Can t Explain , My Generation and I Can See For Miles This was a body of work driven by bitter rivalry, black humour and dark childhood secrets, but it also held up a mirror to a society in transition Now, acclaimed rock biographer Mark Blake goes in search of its inspiration to present a unique perspective on both The Who and the sixties.From their breakthrough as Mod figureheads to the rise and fall of psychedelia, he reveals how The Who, in their explorations of sex, drugs, spirituality and class, refracted the growing turbulence of the time He also lays bare the colourful but crucial role played by their managers, Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp And in the uneasy alliance between art school experimentation and working class ambition he locates the motor of the Swinging Sixties.As the decade closed, with The Who performing Tommy in front of 500,000 people at the Woodstock Festival, the rock opera was born In retrospect, it was the crowning achievement of a band who had already embraced pop art and the concept album who had pioneered the power chord and the guitar smash and who had embodied so than any of their peers the guiding spirit of the age war.

    One thought on “Pretend You're In A War: The Who and the Sixties”

    1. This is an extremely comprehensive look at the great rock 'n' roll band The Who and their activities in the 1960's as they moved from a scrappy mod band to a group of pop music superstars. The book begins with an overview of the childhoods of each of the four principal members of the band as well as a deep dive into the lives of their managers Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp. There is a description of London in the 1950's and early 1960's as a grey place, all stiff upper lip and steady on. The intro [...]

    2. This one is a knockout. Actually made me appreciate the Who's position in the proverbial Rock starscape in a way I never had before. Essentially the story of how The Who became The Who, this is a remarkably focused work which methodically depicts the transformation of the Who from a standard early-60's bar band playing Blues covers to the entity they would become, a powerhouse of songwriting genius and truly idiosyncratic methods of playing (e.g the way Moon plays over, under and around and a be [...]

    3. I was already familiar with the story of the Who but Blake sets it in context with what was going on in the mid to late sixties England and America. That added quite a bit to the story for me. The transition from power pop group creating killer singles to album oriented artists is compelling. Many societal avenues to explore and Blake does a grand job.

    4. A great read. Tons of info about one of my favorite bands of all time. It’s always interesting seeing where these guys came from. Would recommend for all fans of The Who or classic rock in general.I received a free copy for an unbiased review.

    5. I really liked it. I’ve read several books about The Who, and didn’t really think I had much more of substance to learn about them. Shows how little I know! This one gave me new insight into their early years. It turns out their rise to stardom was much more difficult, frustrating, and fraught with conflict than I had realized. That’s good for me to hear, because I've long been romanticizing those early years, and saying to myself, “If only I could have been drumming in The Who in 1964 - [...]

    6. that they survived to make another record beyond tommy was remarkabled I'm really glad they did-ever hear who's next??! particularly illuminating was what I read about kit lambertt lived an insane life-equal to the mania of the who

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