Virginia Woolf in Manhattan

Virginia Woolf in Manhattan What if Virginia Woolf came back to life in the twenty first century Bestselling author Angela Lamb is going through a mid life crisis She dumps her irrepressible daughter Gerda at boarding school and

  • Title: Virginia Woolf in Manhattan
  • Author: Maggie Gee
  • ISBN: 9781846591884
  • Page: 113
  • Format: Hardcover
  • What if Virginia Woolf came back to life in the twenty first century Bestselling author Angela Lamb is going through a mid life crisis She dumps her irrepressible daughter Gerda at boarding school and flies to New York to pursue her passion for Woolf, whose manuscripts are held in a private collection When a bedraggled Virginia Woolf materialises among the bookshelves anWhat if Virginia Woolf came back to life in the twenty first century Bestselling author Angela Lamb is going through a mid life crisis She dumps her irrepressible daughter Gerda at boarding school and flies to New York to pursue her passion for Woolf, whose manuscripts are held in a private collection When a bedraggled Virginia Woolf materialises among the bookshelves and is promptly evicted, Angela, stunned, rushes after her on to the streets of Manhattan.Soon Angela is chaperoning her troublesome heroine as the latter tries to grasp the internet and scams bookshops with rare signed editions Then Virginia insists on flying with her to Istanbul, finds a Turkish admirer and steals the show at an International Conference on Virginia Woolf A witty and profound novel about the miraculous possibilities of a second chance at life.

    One thought on “Virginia Woolf in Manhattan”

    1. Not historical fiction, but whimsical magic realism. Angela Lamb, a middle-aged English novelist, is flying to NYC to view Woolf’s manuscripts at the Berg Collection of the New York Public Library. She hopes to finish preparing for an upcoming Woolf conference in Istanbul – and to take her mind off her shaky marriage to a documentary filmmaker on location in the Arctic. The first line presages magic to come: “There is thunder as Angela flies to New York with Virginia Woolf in her handbag, [...]

    2. Championed by bestselling authors such as Jacqueline Wilson and Patrick Ness, Maggie Gee’s Virginia Woolf in Manhattan was first published in 2014, to great acclaim. The Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain, for instance, term it ‘a remarkable feat’ and ‘an exhilarating novel’.The premise which Gee has focused upon is most inventive: ‘What if Virginia Woolf came back to life in the twenty-first century?’ Rather than simply muse upon this idea, Gee has fashioned quite an original [...]

    3. Since the superlatives used to describe novels have become a little meaningless, I'm going to try not to gush, even though I want to. This is a VERY good novel. It has affected me both as a reader and as a writer. It is about life and love from the perspective of someone who has known both life and death, packaged into a story that sweeps you away. It has everything; characters you want to stay with and listen to and understand, big ideas and closely observed detail; it is thoughtful and thought [...]

    4. I really enjoyed this novel, even if the plot sounds a bit 'barmy' at first. Gee's "Virginia" is a lovely creature, obviously quite a character, rather endearing, and always depicted lovingly and respectfully. Additionally the story is very funny, tongue-in-cheek, pretty clever and rather moving at times. Give yourself a go, you might well like it – even if you consider yourself a serious lover of Woolf's writing, perhaps even more so.

    5. The idea of the 20th century’s greatest female literary icon suddenly coming to life in modern-day New York is a delightful one, so I started reading Virginia Woolf in Manhattan with great enthusiasm.But by page 90 of this overly-long novel, I realised I just didn't care any more. Virginia Woolf in Manhattan manages the tricky feat of being simultaneously both trite and turgid.Maggie Gee handles the celebrated author's reactions to our world clumsily. And her even clumsier attempts to describe [...]

    6. This is going on my TBR list for the sake of a brilliant first line. VIRGINIASuddenly there's time again; and I'm in it. And my Mum sent it to me for Christmas! :-) ♦I still love the line I quote above. But while this was interesting, it made for a sometimes tiresome read. The two modern-day main characters are an odd mix of sympathetic and unlikeable. Virginia is rather wonderfully drawn, and very likeable indeed - but then one can also empathise with Angela's frustration and annoyance at tr [...]

    7. I was really eager to read this. I did not expect to be so disappointed by it. Subjective perspective aside, this is the first book I’ve read in a long time where I really cannot comprehend why people awarded it 5*.Angela Lamb is selfish, boring and hypocritical. But she’s always the victim, oh no, Angela never contributes to her own misery. Gerda and her no-bullshit attitude towards her mother’s negligence and scorn of the pomp attributed to some academics was the saving grace for me. It [...]

    8. This book took me through the journeys Virginia, Angela and Garda take all by themselves. Such visually enriched, sensational surroundings I've been to! Even the places I knew felt different. I didn't look for a literary depth into Virginia Woolf in this novel; but it did made me feel closer to her as a fictitious character from Gee's voice. Very much enjoyed the dual plot and the epistolary communication between Angela and Virginia.

    9. I loved this novel: a love letter to Virginia Woolf, and also to Maggie Gee's daughter. Funny, sharp, inventive, light, dark, and very moving too. Sometimes the daughter subplot felt a little weak, but the gorgeous spirit of the novel just carried me along. Just brilliant. Virginia is a hoot. Highly recommend.

    10. I admit, I struggled with this. I clearly expected a bit more than what I got.First and foremost, the characters accompanying Virginia were infuriating (it seems I would have known that, had I read previous books by the author). Angela could not make her mind about whether she was rich or not - I love a bargain myself, but if I had a chance to bump into Marcel Duchamp, I would buy him as many espressos as he wanted without even thinking about, and I am poor. Furthermore, Angela was just painfull [...]

    11. I couldn’t get to grips with the plot or the characters and found that some of the storylines weren’t even completed. A nice idea to write (at points) in the style of Virginia Woolf, but for me, it never really took off. It has, however, made me want to read more of Woolf’s work, so surely that must be a good thing?

    12. I bought this book almost two three years ago, when Maggie Gee was keynote speaker at the Society of Authors North event at Media City UK, Salford. Yes that’s how far behind I am with my reading. This is an incredibly well written book and it is extremely engaging. The point of view switches constantly between the three main characters – Virginia Woolf, who has come back to life and materialised amongst the manuscripts of her work that are kept in a private collection in New York, Angela Lam [...]

    13. Usually I'm adversed to books celebrating womanhood/sisterhood/mothers & daughters relationship. The reason(s) too complex to fathom unless subtly provoked into it. On a whim, I checked out this book from the library, thinking: maybe this book might change my mind [about the above]. I was not disappointed that it didn't. Alternating between two characters / two voices, it shows how a relationship btwn 2 people (with some background) starts, how things/people admired from afar are usually dis [...]

    14. An enchanting premise, but I was disappointed with the overall style of the book. Despite some lovely passages ("He walked like a dancer or a weightlifter, as if every step was slightly sprung, and his pleasure in my company was like a cloak of finest cashmere keeping me warm."), the writing often felt a little clumsy to me, never quite achieving lift-off. Angela Lamb, the main narrator and modern foil to Virginia Woolf, was rather unappealing, without evoking the delight sometimes to be found i [...]

    15. I would have written. Somehow I would have found my voice. I would have found a way to be heard, published. And so must you. And so will you The young woman beside me tells me that now it is easier to self-publish, but some of you are ashamed to do this. Remember, nearly all my books were self-published.ifyouhaveagardenandalibrary.bl

    16. I didn't really know what to expect with this book. However it was a delight to read. I didn't know much about Virginia before reading this apart from what is in the film "The Hours". I have been meaning to read "To the Lighthouse" for a while now and I shall push it up my book list.

    17. this began very well but the ending I found to be really disappointing. But overall I did like the general of the story and did bring to life Virginia Woolf as an author and espouses the view that one as rule shouldn't meat their heroes.

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