The Engineering Book: From the Catapult to the Curiosity Rover, 250 Milestones in the History of Engineering

The Engineering Book From the Catapult to the Curiosity Rover Milestones in the History of Engineering Engineering is where human knowledge meets real world problems and solves them It s the source of some of our greatest inventions from the catapult to the jet engine Marshall Brain creator of the Ho

  • Title: The Engineering Book: From the Catapult to the Curiosity Rover, 250 Milestones in the History of Engineering
  • Author: Marshall Brain
  • ISBN: 9781454908098
  • Page: 211
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Engineering is where human knowledge meets real world problems and solves them It s the source of some of our greatest inventions, from the catapult to the jet engine Marshall Brain, creator of the How Stuff Works series and a professor at the Engineering Entrepreneurs Program at NCSU, provides a detailed look at 250 milestones in the discipline He covers the various arEngineering is where human knowledge meets real world problems and solves them It s the source of some of our greatest inventions, from the catapult to the jet engine Marshall Brain, creator of the How Stuff Works series and a professor at the Engineering Entrepreneurs Program at NCSU, provides a detailed look at 250 milestones in the discipline He covers the various areas, including chemical, aerospace, and computer engineering, from ancient history to the present The topics include architectural wonders like the Acropolis, the Great Wall of China, and the Eiffel Tower transportation advances such as the high speed bullet train medical innovations, including the artificial heart and kidney dialysis developments in communications, such as the cell phone as well as air conditioning, Wi Fi, the Large Hadron Collider, the self driving car, and .

    One thought on “The Engineering Book: From the Catapult to the Curiosity Rover, 250 Milestones in the History of Engineering”

    1. I have not read much of this yet, but I won't be able to finish it for a while so I wanted to get an opinion out.I have read 4 of these 250 milestones books so far, and this I think is the worst. The author seems to have no sense of history and the historical value of certain "milestones", the importance of their creation in a given time period. He therefore collects things that he only sees around him, tries to date them back as early as possible (which almost exclusively lands him in >1800) [...]

    2. So this book, like the Biology book, has a simple structure; one side is printed with words and the other side has an image relating to the engineering marvel we are talking about. Now, engineers might not have invented a lot of the things in this book, but they make the idea more practical and cost effective. Take the Wright Flyer of 1903. It was made of wood and cloth and went at a speed that was not all that impressive. Over the years, planes have come to their own in being made of stronger m [...]

    3. I had a love/hate relationship with this book. I loved the concept of an overview of engineering milestones but was disappointed by the (necessary) brevity of the articles. I was also confused by the placement of photos with the articles which did not show the subject of the piece. For example, the article about the "Harry Potter Forbidden Journey" ride at the Universal Theme Park is accompanied by a photo of a "robocoaster" in Hanover, Germany. When all was said and done I found this book to be [...]

    4. This book was mildly interesting. I found that some of choices for this book seemed to arbitrary. Some even redundant. And not a mention of the printing press, which seems little confusing considering that the book is a print medium.

    5. This book has really cool facts about really big (and some little) things such as how they managed the heat from the setting cement as they formed Hoover Dam. Sure, you might know some of them already but this book has many and it's all laid out in a very approachable format.

    6. Picture book with descriptions. The pictures sometimes don't really align with the text, such as some modern era image is illustrating something from earlier historical times.

    7. Beautiful pictures. Love how everything is broken up by years. Gives a nice overview of the different technology/engineering feats.

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