1759: The Year Britain Became Master of the World

The Year Britain Became Master of the World If not for the events of the entire history of the world would have been different Called the Year of Victories was the fourth year of the Seven Years or the French and Indian War and def

  • Title: 1759: The Year Britain Became Master of the World
  • Author: Frank McLynn
  • ISBN: 9780802142283
  • Page: 379
  • Format: Paperback
  • If not for the events of 1759, the entire history of the world would have been different Called the Year of Victories, 1759 was the fourth year of the Seven Years, or the French and Indian War and defeat of the French paved the way for the global hegemony of the English language Guiding us through England s conquests and often extremely narrow victories , Frank McLynnIf not for the events of 1759, the entire history of the world would have been different Called the Year of Victories, 1759 was the fourth year of the Seven Years, or the French and Indian War and defeat of the French paved the way for the global hegemony of the English language Guiding us through England s conquests and often extremely narrow victories , Frank McLynn Wagons West brilliantly interweaves primary sources, ranging from material in the Vatican archives to oral histories of Native Americans In a stunning chronicle of a pivotal year in world history, he controversially concludes that the birth of the great British Empire was a result of luck than of rigorous planning.

    One thought on “1759: The Year Britain Became Master of the World”

    1. History books are notably hard to write for an inattentive, probably ill-educated mass audience. Books written by historians for historians are hard to sell, because they're usually inelegantly written. Okay, they're usually BORING to the point of suicide.This is a popular history written like a standard work of today's non-fiction, with real attention to the narrative drive of the story and also a fine hand at illuminating the character of the dramatis personae. McLynn's book is very involving, [...]

    2. In my opinion, this book is grossly under-rated on . McLynn is smart, opinionated but dispassionate, and a fine writer -- though be warned, your dictionary will get a workout. McLynn argues that 1759 was a pivotal year in the Seven Years War, or the French and Indian War as I was taught growing up. What's more, the outcome of this war set the stage for the independence of the American colonies and the development of the British empire in India, Canada, and the West Indies (and, ultimately, much [...]

    3. My principal problem with this book is that I felt as if the author often chose to use words just to prove that he knew some really big words.I don't think I finished it.

    4. A very accessible history of this pivotal year of the Seven Years’ War, a year of British glory and empire building at France’s expense. McLynn divides his chapters based on the war’s different theaters at the time: North America, the West Indies (considered by Britain and France to be far more valuable than North America), Europe and India. He does a great job describing all of the decisive battles like Quiberon Bay and Quebec, and provides good portraits of all the leading figures like G [...]

    5. Loved this book. Author has exceptional grasp of the global complex of actions leading up to and unfolding during 1759. Remarkable picture emerges of the leaders, conflicts, and final wave of conquests that resulted in Britain's mastery of the world of that day.

    6. THE FIRST WORLD WAR Frank McLynn is one of those history writers who get around a fair bit. No specializing on one period, or country, as the subjects of his previous books from "Napoleon", "Villa and Zapata: A Biography of the Mexican Revolution" and "Stanley: Dark Genius of African Exploration" make amply clear. In this book it is not a historical personage who is brought under McLynns scrutiny but a year: 1759; and a conflict: the war between Britain and France which raged at sea, in India, t [...]

    7. Just utterly brilliant - thoroughly entertaining and extremely informative coverage of what was a global conflict in terms of range. Despite the title doesn't spare the lash on some of the incompetent British commanders - or the many French ones. It obviously focuses on the sea and land battles at various locations but the real lesson is how to raise money to fight wars and keep the momentum going - the French were hopeless at this, Pitt (the Elder) was excellent. Lessons that would be useful wh [...]

    8. The year that did change the world. The French, (them again), were defeated on three continents by three separate British armies, this in a time when only wind power got you anywhere! I suspect I maybe one of the last individuals to want to read about Imperial British History, but in reality I wanted to read this book as it shaped the future United States of America. If this year is not studied in US history, then it is a massive mistake. The people who fought the French on the North American co [...]

    9. Entertaining enough, if you like this kind of thing, but a little slipshod. No notes and an extensive bibliography that I suspect wasn't extensively consulted. He quotes Parkman a lot, but Montcalm and Wolfe isn't in the bibliography, so I would assume his quotes are lifted from another secondary source. This makes me wonder if his analysis (particularly his armchair-admiral critiques of naval battles) is 'borrowed,' as well. Frank McLynn writes about everything I'm interested in. I wish I were [...]

    10. This book is very detailed and informative. However, the writing style of the author is very dry.I feel like i'm reading a textbook. It took me a while to get through this book. I would only recommend this book if you really want to learn more about the subject matter, otherwise find somethings else that provides better narration of the events for the year 1759.

    11. A fantastic book which gives a broad and thorough insight into the events of the mid 18th century. Beautifully written, scholarly, thoughtful and elegant, this book was a delight and a pleasure to read.

    12. A good book about the Seven Years War (French & Indian War here in the USA), including campaigns and battles in Europe, India, The Philipines,etc. Historically, it puts the F&I war into the context of how it fit into the overall picture of how Britain became Great.

    13. This is not a book for the general reader who is interested in history. It's so dense and detailed that one gets lost in the names and profusion of facts. For a serious student of the 18th century it is, no doubt, excellent. But I got indigestion and gave it up for another day.

    14. Authors conclusion is spot on about the importance of the year 1759 in world history. Good descriptive details in the writing.

    15. Thus far, the main text is well researched and fairly well written. Avoid the pedantic digressions that head each chapter, however.

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