The Devil and Philosophy: The Nature of His Game

The Devil and Philosophy The Nature of His Game In The Devil and Philosophy philosophers explore questions about one of the most recognizable and influential characters villains of all time From Roman Polanski s The Ninth Gate to J R R Tolkien

  • Title: The Devil and Philosophy: The Nature of His Game
  • Author: Robert Arp
  • ISBN: 9780812698541
  • Page: 112
  • Format: Paperback
  • In The Devil and Philosophy, 34 philosophers explore questions about one of the most recognizable and influential characters villains of all time From Roman Polanski s The Ninth Gate to J R R Tolkien s The Silmarillion to Bram Stoker s Dracula to Darth Vader to Al Pacino s iconic performance in The Devil s Advocate, this book demonstrates that a little devil goes aIn The Devil and Philosophy, 34 philosophers explore questions about one of the most recognizable and influential characters villains of all time From Roman Polanski s The Ninth Gate to J R R Tolkien s The Silmarillion to Bram Stoker s Dracula to Darth Vader to Al Pacino s iconic performance in The Devil s Advocate, this book demonstrates that a little devil goes a long way From humorous appearances, as in Kevin Smith s film Dogma and Chuck Palahniuk s novels Damned and Doomed, to villainous appearances, such as Gabriel Byrne s cold outing as Satan in End of Days, The Devil in Philosophy proves that the Devil comes in many forms.Are there any good arguments for the actual existence of the Devil Does demonic evil thrive in Gotham City Can humans really be accountable for all evil Which truths about the Devil are actual facts Is Milton correct, in that the Devil believes he is doing good Through the lenses of Jung, Kant, Kundera, Balkan, Plato, Bradwardine, Aristotle, Hume, Blackburn, Descartes, Lavey, Thoreau, and Aquinas, The Devil and Philosophy takes a philosophical look at one of time s greatest characters.

    One thought on “The Devil and Philosophy: The Nature of His Game”

    1. Thirty-five philosophers of varying diabolic inclination gather under editor Robert Arp's direction to opine on whether the devil exists, and if so, what might be his objectives. The 35 thinkers spin short and usually entertaining ruminations exploring deviltry's long reach into history, religion, literature and the arts. The scattershot result likely won't change a reader's mind about what Satan's up to if he's actually around, but the book's a breezy, interesting read written with forked tongu [...]

    2. I wasn't expecting much from this, and in the first few chapters, even my low expectations were met with disappointment. I realize now that that's only because I didn't have much of a foundation in the basics of philosophy to start with and thus was unable to appreciate the arguments being made. A few episodes of Crash Course Philosophy later, and this became one of my favorite reads of the year.Kant comes up a lot, and I finally feel like I have a grasp of some of his work thanks to outstanding [...]

    3. We certainly have a love/hate relationship with The Devil.Mostly, we love to hate him.Although, we also love to reference him in:movies, TV, books, Halloween costumes,music, idioms, cartoons, legends,even basing characters on him…now, let’s put a smile on that face!Had a Devil of a Time finding some of these:1. Speak of the devil - if a friend says this when you show up, you have to wonder.2. Better the Devil you know - seems like you just don’t want to take a chance.3. Devil looks after h [...]

    4. All the contributors seemed to have a sympathetic soft spot for the Devil. That's cool. Me too. The only complaints I have is that Archmagus Satanhugger toward the end there talked too goddamn much.While we're at it, how in the hell did a trio of unaccredited third-wave tumblr feminists manage to slip an erroneous reference to a 77 cent wage gap into a book of philosophical essays about Lucifer?Twenty three cents says the editors stopped reading their chapter after the blithe, unseemly allusion [...]

    5. An interesting read, which examines the Devil and his followers in many of their guises. While it lost a point for wandering, I would recomend it to anyone interested in the subject.I am curious about one of the submitting authors. When Magus Peter H. Gilmore of the Church of Satan is introduced at parties, is he introduced as Magus, like a priest would be introduced as Father?

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