The Ladies' Guide to True Politeness and Perfect Manners or, Miss Leslie's Behaviour Book

The Ladies Guide to True Politeness and Perfect Manners or Miss Leslie s Behaviour Book This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers You may find it for free on the web Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery

  • Title: The Ladies' Guide to True Politeness and Perfect Manners or, Miss Leslie's Behaviour Book
  • Author: Eliza Leslie
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 330
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers You may find it for free on the web Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

    One thought on “The Ladies' Guide to True Politeness and Perfect Manners or, Miss Leslie's Behaviour Book”

    1. Full review at Smart Bitches, Trashy BooksIn the early 1800s, if you were a woman in America or England who wanted to know how to cook, how to run a household, and how to behave, you were likely to turn to Eliza Leslie, also known as Miss Leslie. As a member of the middle class (her father was a watchmaker) who lived in England and America, Miss Leslie imparted advice that could help the reader cope with an aristocratic ball or a low-grade boarding house, at home or abroad, with equal aplomb.The [...]

    2. I am fairly positive that "Eliza Leslie" is actually Lady Catherine de Bourgh (an antebellum Lady Catherine from Philadelphia, to be sure, but stranger things have happened). There is something regally ridiculous about her narrative voice. Some choice edicts:"No colours are more ungenteel, or in worse taste, than reddish lilacs, reddish purples, and reddish browns.""Above all, do not travel in white kid gloves. Respectable women never do."* "Ladies no longer eat salt-fish at a public-table.""Pou [...]

    3. Both historical and hilarious, Miss Leslie's Behaviour Book makes for an enjoyable read. Some of her injunctions for upper class ladies really got me thinking, and the author's intelligent wit and personality shine through each line.However, Miss Leslie is very obviously misogynistic and racist- she seems to prefer African American servants, and detests Irish ones. It was fascinating to see how completely she had internalized the rigid societal norms and niceties of her era.As a fan of historica [...]

    4. Good common senseI thought this book would be good for a laugh. Instead I found a lot of good solid advice that would apply to any time. Yes, it is rare to see a woman carrying a fan these days, so advice on how to handle it is outdated. But other things such as splitting up your money and putting it in different pockets or purses when you're traveling is good advice anytime. I found nothing to laugh it and much to admire.

    5. Times changeIt's difficult to know how to review etiquette of another era. Her world is not mine. Some of it reminds me of advice I received in childhood from elders--pay your way, so no boy "expects anything", don't annoy others with your opinions, be grateful or silent. Much, thankfully, has changed. This is most easily apparent in sections about ship travel, "the help", "the colored", and the like.

    6. Miss Eliza Leslie was the Miss Manners of 19th century America. Read a very interesting review of her etiquette book at Smart Bitches Trashy Books. Free for Kindle and at Project Gutenberg.

    7. How in hell could you wear mittens while eating? And, more important, why would you want to? I would've made a truly shitty Victorian lady.

    8. Very entertaining I found this book to be very entertaining and fun. My how times have changed and in a very good way

    9. Kind of dreary bleating instruction manual for upper class Victorian American ladies. It was amusing at first but then became really dull. It is interesting from a social history point of view, but after 15% in I got extremely bored with the endless rules upon rules on every trifling thing.

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