The Parafaith War

The Parafaith War Some bad ideas go back a long way and this one goes all the way back to the original home planet Someone s god told them they had a right to territory so they figure they can take what they want by di

  • Title: The Parafaith War
  • Author: L.E. Modesitt Jr.
  • ISBN: 9780812538946
  • Page: 149
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Some bad ideas go back a long way and this one goes all the way back to the original home planet Someone s god told them they had a right to territory so they figure they can take what they want by divine right In the far future among the colonized worlds of the galaxy there s a war going on between the majority of civilized worlds and a colonial theocracy.TrystinSome bad ideas go back a long way and this one goes all the way back to the original home planet Someone s god told them they had a right to territory so they figure they can take what they want by divine right In the far future among the colonized worlds of the galaxy there s a war going on between the majority of civilized worlds and a colonial theocracy.Trystin Desoll grows up fighting against religious fanatics and becomes a hero, a first class pilot, then, amazingly, a spy.What do you do if you re a relatively humane soldier fighting millions of suicidal volunteers on the other side who know that they are utterly right and you are utterly wrong, with no middle ground Trystin Desoll has an idea.

    One thought on “The Parafaith War”

    1. There are two civilizations space faring civilizations of man; a theocracy with a population problem & a technocratic society with a resource problem. They have limited contact, generally through attacks of the theocracy to take over planets which the technocrats have mostly terraformed. Told from the point of view of a soldier of the technocrats, a cyborg, we see a small portion of the war & the moral decisions he faces. There is an alien race to highlight the moral dilemma.Well done &a [...]

    2. Good. yes, it's comparable to Heinlein and Haldeman, but didn't generate that visceral response. Well-developed, if sometime plodding, story. Modesitt managed to skewer everyone from ecologist to religious fanatics to racists. Introspective, if unbelievable hero.The preaching gets a bit old, too.

    3. Not sure how I missed the Mormon-bashing the first time around (hidden in Western culture bashing), but that aside, it's an amazing book. Interesting Green politics sprinkled throughout.

    4. Loved itSuch a great story of cultural acceptance. This book was a joy to read and it had a great moral to the story.

    5. Futuristic humans are fighting over worlds based on religious difference. Trystin Desoll is first and officer manning an outpost to resist the Revs and later a space pilot. Eventually he is transferred to intelligence where he will take on his most dangerous mission. A good read but personally I prefer the Imager and Recluse series.

    6. This is the kind of novel that sci-fi is about. It is a novel about a war that speaks to a major social issue. The first half of the book sets up a universe at war. This part of the book goes into large detail about the defense of a developing world from religious radicals. The action sequences are for the most part very good. The second half of the book is about the main characters attempt to find a solution to the war by acting as an intelligence agent for his race. He has been helped by a gro [...]

    7. A long time ago, humans destroyed the earth's environment with their greedy wants and wars. Moving onto other worlds humanity broke into two factions: the Greens, mostly comprised of the brown people's of the world and crazy religious zealots, mostly white people. Trystin, a soldier for the Greens, is an anomaly, though: tall, white, and blonde, he is a dedicated soldier but an outsider because of his looks. Modesitt plays with identity a little with this, but it is mostly a plot device. The rel [...]

    8. If you liked Dune but thought it was too heavy, or too literary, try this. Not destined for the same genre-defining classic status, this was much the more enjoyable read, while still examining the interaction of religion and politics, this time in the face of war rather than competing agendas and business interests. The fact that Modesitt maintains the first-person point of view of a single protagonist probably helps as well, sheerly by simplifying matters.On the other hand, if you prefer hard s [...]

    9. This is the latest of several re-reads. This is one of my favorite sf novels. In short, it's every Heinlein juvenile, compressed into one book. 'Nuff said.Don't read the sequel. It's not nearly as good and will leave you with a bad taste for quite a while. Instead, extract all of the epigraphs from the chapter headings of "The Parafaith War", organize them by the 3 sources and read them. I'd buy these if they weren't fictional.

    10. If you like somewhat thoughtful speculative fiction you could do worse than Modesitt's Ecolitan, and Parafaith war series. Unlike the more sugary and rote items in his Recluse books, he takes a more hard science look at resource scarcity, politics, and the inevitable clash of civilizations. A very decent read.

    11. One multiplanet empire is civilized, and the other fanatically obeys its prophet's instructions to multiply and take possession of the universe. Rising young officer Trystin Desoll, exhausted after years of battling on the side of the rational empire, has an idea of how to make the two coexist.It starts out looking like a teenaged boys' adventure, but deepens in crescendo.

    12. First part of this book was pretty typical Sci-fi with techno babble, but I really got into this book at the latter part where Trystin was sent to the enemy territory as one of the returned from a mission I better read more of his books.

    13. I was wondering where this book was going till I got half way through. It was interesting setting the stage but the last half pick up speed and was compelling. It's really a historical bibliography of one person (tryston). A good, fun medium read.

    14. Having read the Ethos Effect a few years back, I was expectant of it being good. It was so. The way the day to day universe is crafted coupled with the weighty matters of ethics, beliefs and ideas is so terrific.

    15. I'm of mixed emotions about rereading this; it's not that it's not good, it's just that it's a very familiar set of character archetypes for Modesitt's work, and it's not quite as polished as he eventually is.

    16. Intriguing if a little slow in the first half. Tells the story of a young pilot, embroiled in a battle with the ultra religious revenants of the profit. Clearly influenced by the authors anti religious sentiment, as an interesting footnote he currently lives in Mormon stronghold, Utah.

    17. Really good story, very engaging, my first by this author, I'll definitely read more of his books, I wish this book was part of a series, sad to see it end.

    18. An interesting look at the balance between religion and science and what can happen when religion goes astray.

    19. I actually didn't like this novel, but couldn't find a way to delete it from my shelf. At 153 pages in, I still fail to see where this is going and a central plotline developing.

    20. love how L.E. Modesitt Jr. makes you think about the stupid things mankind does while keeping the book fantastically entertaining.

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