Knitting Vintage Socks

Knitting Vintage Socks This collection of vintage sock patterns mines Weldon s Practical Needlework a compilation of newsletters published than years ago for some of the best Includes updates of classic patterns fo

  • Title: Knitting Vintage Socks
  • Author: NancyBush
  • ISBN: 9781931499651
  • Page: 105
  • Format: Hardcover
  • This collection of vintage sock patterns mines Weldon s Practical Needlework, a compilation of newsletters published than 100 years ago, for some of the best Includes updates of 24 classic patterns for modern knitters.

    One thought on “Knitting Vintage Socks”

    1. Hey Oh! Who loves knitting socks more than me? No one! This book is rife with info about knitting socks but also the history of knitting socks and even wool in Europe vs. wool here in the state and how and why they differ. Even if you don't know the difference between knitting and purling, the first part of this book has enough history to keep you interested.

    2. Basically the ugliest art direction ever, but it's a workhorse of a book. Wish I'd thought to buy the spiral-bound edition.

    3. Wonderful knitted sock patterns! Of all the sock pattern books I own, this one has the least number of socks that are on my Must Knit list, but it's still a great book!

    4. Great patterns, even some history of knitting (I'm a total geek, I admit it). Some of the heels are funky though, so I don't use the ones the pattern calls for.

    5. This has some really great enduring and useful patterns. I like the way there are alternative heel treatments. I'll be using these patterns over and over again. If you just love to knit and gift socks and enjoy practical and easy to understand patterns, this is a great source.

    6. Should have done more research before buying and not trusted all the raves about this being a good source of multiple and obscure types of heels. To me that means more than one method of construction; what this book actually has is mainly minor variations on the tired old flap-and-gusset (my least favourite heel style as I consider it weak engineering to have picked-up stitches pulling at right angles in a garment stress point) plus a couple of other heel types that are fairly well known. Furthe [...]

    7. For those knitters interested in patterns from the Victorian era, Nancy Bush has gone through all the knitting issues of Weldon's Practical Needlework, updating a select few to modern yarns & terminology. She also includes a good history of the periodical and places the publication in context of British history. Another knitting publication from Interweave Press, it is pretty obvious that they know their audience. The hard cover, coil bound book is a good size to travel with and will lie fla [...]

    8. An excellent book on knitting socks. The beginning chapter provides a basic template for socks. It then proceeds to cover the different kinds of toes and heels showing pictures of each and explaining how to knit each one. The patterns are excellent and clear and it is easy to substitute the different toe types or heel types according to your preferences.If I could have only one book in my library on knitting socks, this would be the one I would want.

    9. Another historical knitting book with patterns added, the format is a spiral bound bard cover which makes for easy pattern reading because the book lays flat when you're knitting up your socks.I still need to review this book as I knit up some holiday gift socks so this is a review that will be modified as I use the book.3 stars for now.

    10. This arrived on the friday and I was knitting by the saturday. I love the idea of using vintage patterns and this book is delightfully illustrate and the patterns are great. There's a little history as well without deviating from the original plan of the book - knitting! And I love the spiral bound format as it prevents the book from closing on you as you're trying to follow the pattern

    11. Adaptations of patterns found in Weldon's Practical Needlework from the late 1887 to 1914. A short section on the history of Weldon's with quotes from the original. Directions for 4 different heels and 6 toe shapings and 20 sock patternss, including heelless sleep socks.Much more than I'm up for but glad I borrowed it.

    12. The patterns were less interesting than the historical documentation showing knitted socks dating back to the reign of Henry VIII. Specific sock designs and patterns were used to designate family names and relationships.p. for fisherman who went to work,often died at sea, and could only be identified by their socks.

    13. Every pattern in this book is fantastic, and the discussion of 19th-century knitting and review of different types of heels and toes are lovely references, too. My only complaint about this book is that the photography is not very good--but displaying any handknits unworn when they are intended as articles of clothing is a pet peeve of mine.

    14. I love this book! I relish the historical theme and Bush writes or rewrites the patterns in an understandable way. I'm still making the railway stitch socks but haven't made anything else and the library won't let me renew it anymore. I will seek it out again in the future.

    15. Not a beginner's book (no size variations for one thing), and a few more charts would be nice, but really fascinating. I have two pairs of socks from this book on needles right now, one for my husband and one for my son, and I think they'll actually wear them!

    16. There are a few lovely stitch patterns in here that I'd like to use someday (Gentleman's Shooting Stocking, Gentleman's Sock, Child's First Sock), but I dislike how each pattern is one size. As a sock noob, I'm looking for someone else to do the stitch count work for me!

    17. Weldon's Practical Needlework was a monthly publication from 1886 to the end of the 1920's. Nancy Bush took many of the old patterns and translated them into projects understandable and executable by modern knitters.I liked the photographs, charts, instructions, and drawings.

    18. I'm learning four new different types of heel and toe construction. Fascinating to see how socks were made not that long ago.

    19. Beautiful designs, recreated from historical pieces and photos. Nancy Bush is a wonder. I've knit several pairs from this book and never had an issue. A very important book in my knitting library.

    20. I've never knit socks from this book, but I like looking at it. Unfortunately, I do not foresee myself making any of these. It's still a nice book.

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