The Khrushchev Era 1953-1964

The Khrushchev Era History and politics students alike will welcome this new Seminar Study which analyses the Khrushchev era a critical period of Soviet and world history It was Khrushchev who in finally filled t

  • Title: The Khrushchev Era 1953-1964
  • Author: Martin McCauley
  • ISBN: 9780582277762
  • Page: 482
  • Format: Paperback
  • History and politics students alike will welcome this new Seminar Study which analyses the Khrushchev era a critical period of Soviet and world history It was Khrushchev who, in 1957, finally filled the political vacuum left by the death of Stalin in 1953 He was an erratic, impulsive, inspirational and innovative leader who addressed the fundamental problems of the coHistory and politics students alike will welcome this new Seminar Study which analyses the Khrushchev era a critical period of Soviet and world history It was Khrushchev who, in 1957, finally filled the political vacuum left by the death of Stalin in 1953 He was an erratic, impulsive, inspirational and innovative leader who addressed the fundamental problems of the country and yet he was, Martin McCauley argues, a brilliant failure In this study the author explores all aspects of the Khrushchev era including reforms in agriculture, economic policy, crises in Eastern Europe, the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, de Stalinisation and Khrushchev s attempts to reform the Communist Party.

    One thought on “The Khrushchev Era 1953-1964”

    1. I picked this book up casually at the library. It’s an A-level history book, and only 125 pages long. It was a useful read. A bit too précised for my liking, but this was helped by the fact that Khrushchev followed Stalin, and I knew enough about the issues facing Stalin to have some sort of bedrock for reading about his successor. Having said that, I think there were large tracts of Soviet history during this period which just slipped over my head. There was not enough space in the book for [...]

    2. It might not be the most in-depth history of Khrushchev's administration, but the author's British sense of humor earns this one a five-star rating.

    3. Although I had to read this for my Europe Since 1945 class back in college, it was one of the more enjoyable reads.

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