Sports Analytics: A Guide for Coaches, Managers, and Other Decision Makers

Sports Analytics A Guide for Coaches Managers and Other Decision Makers Benjamin C Alamar founded the first journal dedicated to sports statistics the Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports He developed and teaches a class on sports analytics for managers at the Univ

  • Title: Sports Analytics: A Guide for Coaches, Managers, and Other Decision Makers
  • Author: Benjamin C. Alamar
  • ISBN: 9780231162920
  • Page: 387
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Benjamin C Alamar founded the first journal dedicated to sports statistics, the Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports He developed and teaches a class on sports analytics for managers at the University of San Francisco and has published numerous cutting edge studies on strategy and player evaluation Today, he cochairs the sports statistics section of the InternatioBenjamin C Alamar founded the first journal dedicated to sports statistics, the Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports He developed and teaches a class on sports analytics for managers at the University of San Francisco and has published numerous cutting edge studies on strategy and player evaluation Today, he cochairs the sports statistics section of the International Statistics Institute and consults with several professional teams and businesses in sports analytics.There isn t a better representative of this emerging field to show diverse organizations how to implement analytics into their decision making strategies, especially as analytic tools grow increasingly complex Alamar provides a clear, easily digestible survey of the practice and a detailed understanding of analytics vast possibilities He explains how to evaluate different programs and put them to use Using concrete examples from professional sports teams and case studies demonstrating the use and value of analytics in the field, Alamar designs a roadmap for managers, general managers, and other professionals as they build their own programs and teach their approach to others.

    One thought on “Sports Analytics: A Guide for Coaches, Managers, and Other Decision Makers”

    1. Although there were some interesting insights from this book, I found it very frustrating. First of all, what is the purpose of this book? Instead of being an interesting and informative book for curious analytic fans, it seems as if it was meant for sport owners/general managers to read who have no idea what analytics is, just so they could hire Alamar. If that was his intention, I wish him the best of luck.This book reaffirms my belief that nobody on the outside truly has the information to ev [...]

    2. He is incredibly vague. Having worked for many professional teams, he's not allowed to disclose proprietary stuff from his experience. So he totally speaks in generalities. "One MLB team" "One NBA team's executives"He talks about a grading scale to evaluate coaches for hire. Gives nothing about what that scale entails.The book also has been vetted by the peer-review process, so I found it useful in my research on the state of the sports analytics industry. Some reviewers have said it has nothin [...]

    3. Accessible for the lay person Easily read for the lay person or old school coach who is not used to the changing world of sports data. Also good for the fan who may wish to have a peek behind the scenes of the changing world of how his favorite team is put together. I'm a sports fan but also a sports fiction writer. I picked this book up to get a better grasp of what a character I crafted might think like. It's been good for deepening my understanding of his fictive mindset.

    4. This is a fine book. It's meant to be read from an organisational point of view, not necessarily from that of a fan. I thought there were many interesting and useful insights for me as a coach trying to discover how to use the data I have at my disposal. The book describes a way of thinking, more than a particular system, or specific stats and what they mean.

    5. Interesting to know that at least according to the author pro teams are not as neck deep in analytics as you'd think they'd be given they're looking for every possible small edge.

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