Beware of the Bouquet

Beware of the Bouquet Martha works for an advertising agency filming a TV commercial on location in Cornwall Her boss s new client is the eccentric owner of a chemicals company that has invented a new almost irresistible

  • Title: Beware of the Bouquet
  • Author: Joan Aiken
  • ISBN: 9780671777319
  • Page: 229
  • Format: None
  • Martha works for an advertising agency, filming a TV commercial on location in Cornwall Her boss s new client is the eccentric owner of a chemicals company that has invented a new, almost irresistible perfume, and Martha is in charge of shooting the romantic ads unfortunately starring his difficult daughter in law.In a witty parody of the classic gothic, Martha soon becMartha works for an advertising agency, filming a TV commercial on location in Cornwall Her boss s new client is the eccentric owner of a chemicals company that has invented a new, almost irresistible perfume, and Martha is in charge of shooting the romantic ads unfortunately starring his difficult daughter in law.In a witty parody of the classic gothic, Martha soon becomes embroiled in a conspiracy over the missing perfume formula as the increasingly incredible plot strands which include an amorous sheikh, a series of exploding soup cans and a kidnapped baby mount to a hair raising climax around her.

    One thought on “Beware of the Bouquet”

    1. this is the first Joan Aiken book I've read, and it will not be my last. Although it didn't take off until page 70, from that point forward it was a roller coastere plot was similar to what you might find in a Mary Stewart novel. Modern working girl (1966, that is!) at ad agency getting embroiled in a situation that brings menace, danger, gothic chills (yes, by the end, yikes!) but what I find unique about Aiken's writing is that the heroine is so funny.ever and wittyI more than once laughed out [...]

    2. This was my first novel by Aiken and it is just as bizarre as the title suggests. If you expect a traditional gothic (judging by the cover and the summary on this site) you will be disappointed. There are some very suspensefull scenes; in fact, I found it unputdownable around the middle. It is a lot more humorous than any gothic or mystery I have read before. The atmosphere is very breezy and modern, but there is a slight level of absurdity underneath everything that made it hard for me to conne [...]

    3. Fun! Though a few plotlines were left to dangle a bit, or resolved too quickly. I enjoyed the peek into the world of a 1960s London ad agency, just like I enjoyed the 1920s London ad agency in Dorothy Sayers's "Murder Must Advertise." It gave the book a breezy feel that was unexpected in a Gothic thriller, and made the heroine seem more intelligent and capable than many Gothic heroines, since she's often working even while escaping evildoers. Gotta do something on the train.

    4. When a friend on commented favorably on Joan Aiken's Jane Austen inspired books, I remembered having read her in the past and went digging through old paperbacks in one of my many yet to be purged bookcases. I found a ragged second-hand Ace Gothic paperback published in 1966 with the silly title of Beware of the Bouquet and pulled it out to read over the holidays. Now I know why I am loathe to purge my bookshelves. This book was fun! Published in the heydey of gothics -- I prefer the term roman [...]

    5. Despite the fact that Joan Aiken is my favorite children's author of all time, this book was not for me. I think I'm just of the wrong era to appreciate this romp - instead of finding it nostalgic and campy (which I understand it was rather meant to be), I thought it was dated and honestly rather offensive in its stereotypes. That being said, I was invested in the story and anxiously sped towards the resolution. I have a few more of her out of print novels I purchased used that I will still read [...]

    6. Although a period piece - it must have been written 50 years ago, and is of its time - this is one of those books you just can't put down. Beautifully written, with interesting characters and incredible twists, "Trouble with Product X" is great fun to read I have posted a longer review in my blog at aaabbott/2017/01/thrille

    7. Joan Aiken (1924-2004) began her writing career with YA fiction as a 16-year-old contributor for the BBC Children's Hour. Aiken's efforts at mysteries and suspense novels won her an Edgar Award for Best Young Adult Novel (Night Fall) in 1972. The same touch of the quirky, whimsical inventiveness in her writing for young people often found its way into her adult crime fiction. She once said, "Stories are like butterflies, which come fluttering out of nowhere, touch down for a brief instant, may b [...]

    8. I'm a fan of Joan Aiken's work, but this book was a bit disappointing. Nothing really wrong with the plot, and many small clever details, but I didn't buy the behavior of most of the characters, especially the protagonist — who seemed to be capable and idiotic by turns. That made the book less appealing by a large margin. I'd recommend trying other work of Aiken's before this one.

    9. Note: also known as "The Trouble with Product X"at last climactic scene! So much over the top authorial creativity; definitely impossible to forget. I'm glad I was able to find a copy of this for my very own. It's a frequent re-read.

    10. A mystery unlike anything else I'd ever read by Joan Aiken. (I was introduced to Aiken by way of "The Wolves of Willoughby Chase" and other juveniles). Suspenseful and interesting. It made me go look to see what other mysteries of hers I could find.

    11. Also known as "Beware the Bouquet".I do love Aiken's Gothics. So fun, creative and weird! at last climactic scene! So much over the top authorial creativity; definitely impossible to forget. I'm glad I was able to find a copy of this for my very own. It's a frequent re-read.

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