Algebraic Number Theory and Fermat's Last Theorem

Algebraic Number Theory and Fermat s Last Theorem First published in and written by two distinguished mathematicians with a special gift for exposition this book is now available in a completely revised third edition It reflects the exciting de

  • Title: Algebraic Number Theory and Fermat's Last Theorem
  • Author: Ian Stewart David Tall
  • ISBN: 9781568811192
  • Page: 431
  • Format: Hardcover
  • First published in 1979 and written by two distinguished mathematicians with a special gift for exposition, this book is now available in a completely revised third edition It reflects the exciting developments in number theory during the past two decades that culminated in the proof of Fermat s Last Theorem Intended as a upper level textbook, it is also eminently suitedFirst published in 1979 and written by two distinguished mathematicians with a special gift for exposition, this book is now available in a completely revised third edition It reflects the exciting developments in number theory during the past two decades that culminated in the proof of Fermat s Last Theorem Intended as a upper level textbook, it is also eminently suited as a text for self study.

    One thought on “Algebraic Number Theory and Fermat's Last Theorem”

    1. A very good account of algebraic-number theory, a branch of mathematics whose genesis was motivated by the search for a proof of Fermat’s last theorem, as well as a brief discussion of the ideas used by Andrew Wiles for his Wolfskehl Prize winning proof. I thought the theory of ideals could be developed a bit further, but I understand that the central theme of the book is on FLT.

    2. Good overview of algebraic number theory as it applies to FLT, however not exactly pitched at beginners. You'll want to have a grounding in abstract algebra & linear algebra at the minimum. Still, even if you don't, you can get a good sense of the "big picture" and a high-level understanding of the advances in mathematics that were directly or indirectly related to attempts to solve FLT. Overall a fascinating read if you're a math geek who wants something a little deeper than Simon Singh's p [...]

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