The Redress Of Poetry: Oxford Lectures

The Redress Of Poetry Oxford Lectures From the recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature comes a collection of essays based on lectures he delivered while Professor of Poetry at Oxford The great Irish poet delivers wisdom about his

  • Title: The Redress Of Poetry: Oxford Lectures
  • Author: Seamus Heaney
  • ISBN: 9780571175628
  • Page: 319
  • Format: Unknown Binding
  • From the recipient of the 1995 Nobel Prize for Literature comes a collection of essays based on lectures he delivered while Professor of Poetry at Oxford The great Irish poet delivers wisdom about his craft in a style full of humor and devoid of pedantry With his expansive spirit, Heaney examines poets such as Brian Merriman, Oscar Wilde, Dylan Thomas and, of course, WilFrom the recipient of the 1995 Nobel Prize for Literature comes a collection of essays based on lectures he delivered while Professor of Poetry at Oxford The great Irish poet delivers wisdom about his craft in a style full of humor and devoid of pedantry With his expansive spirit, Heaney examines poets such as Brian Merriman, Oscar Wilde, Dylan Thomas and, of course, William Butler Yeats The Redress of Poetry is a rare opportunity to enter the lecture hall and learn from a master.

    One thought on “The Redress Of Poetry: Oxford Lectures”

    1. This might seem an odd choice: a collection of lectures about poetry, some of them to an Oxford audience. Sounds stuffy as can be - but it isn't. Wherever they were first heard, each lecture was written to be understood by anyone, and send them back to the works they cover.The best piece, and perhaps the book's moral quaystone, is titled 'Joy or Night', comparing and contrasting Yeats and Larkin, their views on death and its influence on their poetry (and far more than that). Other joys include [...]

    2. An excellent series of lectures given by Seamus Heaney in his post as Professor of Poetry at Oxford University. The ability for a reader to engage with Heaney's erudition will depend on the extent to which he or she knows of the poems and poets being discussed. Heaney deliberately focusses on poets who are writing on the frontiers of their societies - those frontiers being national, class and linguistic.The first lecture is really quite superb and sets the tone well. After that his lectures on t [...]

    3. What a lovely, deep appreciation of poets and poetry by this master of the art! I learned so much about how this is done, and what matters the most about the doing and what results from the workuly enlightening - loved the lectures!

    4. In Seamus Heaney’s Casualty, a poem about a pub-going Ulsterman who ignores a curfew during the peak of the Troubles, and is killed for it, the last three lines (the poet speaking to the dead man, the “casualty”), are a study in ambivalence:“Dawn-sniffing revenant, Plodder through midnight rain, Question me again.”The ambivalence is one that runs through Heaney’s poetry, perhaps best exemplified by the section in Station Island, where (in a fictional meeting), James Joyce tells the p [...]

    5. This is a collection of lectures that Heaney gave while professor of poetry at Oxford. The theme, redress as a potential function of poetry, is handled with depth and breadth, including working in the relationship, political and cultural, between Ireland and England. Several definitions of "redress" are pursued, which results in a sense of poetry that unites the imaginative with social conscience.

    6. I've bought this amazing book on my trip to Poland, on 2009. I found it in the most amazing bookstore I've ever been to in my entire life, called Massolit Books & Cafe, fell in love with the place immediately. This book is a collection of lectures regarding Irish Poets and Poetry, and it is so in depth and interesting that there were chapters I couldn't stop reading. Simply fascinating.

    7. Poetry "is the imagination pressing back against the pressure of reality."Most enjoyed the titular essay and the pieces on Yeats and Larkin, Bishop (her "flicker of impudence"), and "Frontiers of Writing." I feel like I do not connect as naturally with Heaney as I do with other modern greats, and so I always feel that I must try harder.

    8. A great book to dip in and out oflove the analysis aspects as not so overly-academic as to make you switch offI am reading the lecture on 'The Ballad of Reading Gaol' and it really zones in on aspects of Oscar Wilde that give a different type of insight and makes for really addictive reading.

    9. One of my favorite reads possibly ever. Can't be read lightly. Had to sit with chapters/essays in doses because there was so much to take in. I will reread this book many times, and suspect I'll be learning something new from it with every read. Cannot recommend this book highly enough.

    10. "The felicity of cadence, the chain reaction of a rhyme, the auto-eroticism of an etymology, such things can proceed happily and, as it were, autistically in an area of operations cordoned-off by and from the critical sense." p. 6

    11. I have a feeling I will be re-reading this book frequently in the coming years. It felt like meeting an old friend for the first time, and walking away with the knowledge that further acquaintance will only serve to deepen my regard.

    12. An excellent collection of insightful essays. You're always grateful when a book expands your horizons and introduces you to new writers that you enjoy, as Heaney did for me here with his fine piece on Elizabeth Bishop 'Counting to a Hundred'.

    13. An excellent set of essays on the nature and demands of poetry, as well as its responsibilities. His defense of the need for poetry as a means of understanding our world was excellent.

    14. I thoroughly enjoyed these lectures on the redress of poetry. Heaney writes a charming prose and his thinking on the way poets try to right the balance is still fresh.

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