A Fall of Moondust

A Fall of Moondust Time is running out for the passengers and crew of the tourist cruiser Selene incarcerated in a sea of choking lunar dust On the surface her rescuers find their resources stretched to the limit by t

  • Title: A Fall of Moondust
  • Author: Arthur C. Clarke
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 320
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Time is running out for the passengers and crew of the tourist cruiser Selene, incarcerated in a sea of choking lunar dust On the surface, her rescuers find their resources stretched to the limit by the mercilessly unpredictable conditions of a totally alien environment A brilliantly imagined story of human ingenuity and survival, A FALL OF MOONDUST is a tour de force ofTime is running out for the passengers and crew of the tourist cruiser Selene, incarcerated in a sea of choking lunar dust On the surface, her rescuers find their resources stretched to the limit by the mercilessly unpredictable conditions of a totally alien environment A brilliantly imagined story of human ingenuity and survival, A FALL OF MOONDUST is a tour de force of psychological suspense and sustained dramatic tension by the field s foremost author.

    One thought on “A Fall of Moondust”

    1. The Earth's Moon, in the mid 21st Century, this frontier land is slowly growing , the future is in its tranquil cities under lunar domes ( Clavius City, population 52,647) . Tourism is a key to financial survival on this remote, hostile world. Selene (Moon Goddess), a hovercraft designed to float over the lunar surface, especially on the treacherous Sea of Thirst, above the moondust. Only one of these "boats," has been built, if successful others will follow you would think . In charge of Selene [...]

    2. As satisfying as a good HARD SF can be, one complaint often leveled against them is that they are TOO LONG-winded and pageTHICK and that those employing IT don't have the proper skills (story-making, that is) to create the narrative friction and plot rhythm requisite to bring the reading experience to a truly enjoyable climax. Well, at under 225 pages, this story's tight, well-honed body is a classic example of "hard" science fiction doing it right. I DID IT, liked it and I would DO IT again and [...]

    3. Finally Got Around ToBack in the 80s when I was swimming through Asimov, Herbert, and Clarke, I distinctly remember picking A Fall of Moondust off my high school library's shelf and reading the first page, then putting it back to save for later.A Fall of Moondust might be the closest thing to a suspense thriller Arthur Clarke ever wrote. Due to a freak moonquake, the tourist bus/spacecraft Selene gets buried 15 meters below one of the lunar "seas" in a region of dust with bizarre, liquid-like pr [...]

    4. Kada bih proljevao ego kao neki onda bih mogao napisati da je Clarkea pojelo vrijeme i da je ovo jako staro i ne uzbudljivo :) No, Clarke je pitak, moćan, izuzetno znanstven i skočan. Uživanje je čitati starog majstora. Više puta sam si postavio pitanj: "Kako li je samo bilo ljubiteljima fantastike davne 61. godine kada je knjiga napisana?" Kako su samo oni uživali u ovim bravurijama boga znanstvene fantastike. Bi sam na Sferakonu gdje je jedan hrvatski SF pisac govorio kako je prerastao C [...]

    5. Before there was The Martian (and indeed, before Apollo 13), there was A Fall of Moondust. I don’t know if the one influenced the other, but the feel is very much the same: people are stranded in a situation in space in which there are problems of communication, air, sanity, etc. (The exact same situations don’t come up, but the same basic problems apply, as of course they would.) I’m not sure how feasible the science of the Sea of Thirst is, but Clarke makes it work within the story, and [...]

    6. One of the first novels by Arthur C Clarke that I read as a kid. Part hard science fiction, part suspenseful thriller, it was a good story then and now.This is a book about saving the lives of people on the moon. It is along the same lines as The Martian, using science and clever ideas to overcome setbacks. Instead of one person trapped, it is a group of 20, and Clarke has fun with their group dynamic. He also uses them as a vehicle to discuss the cult of UFO watchers. Other characters are also [...]

    7. Arthur C. Clarke is one of those authors of whom I'm never quite sure how fond I am. I hear his name and think “Gee willikers, I love Arthur C. Clarke!” And then I think back over the books I've read by him and I'm not so sure. Before today I'd read a total of thirteen books written or co-written by him, and had given him a rather underwhelming average score of 2.4 out of 5. If one ignores the ones he co-authored (and their style in each case suggests that his co-author did most of the writi [...]

    8. This book was such a great read for me. I picked it up and felt I was immediately thrust into this lunar environment. The action was paced sublimely. Although the science of a "sea of sand" was not correct, it was easy to suspend belief for this extremely well written story.

    9. ORIGINALLY POSTED AT Fantasy Literature.Pat Harris is the captain of Selene, the only tour bus on the moon. Every day he and his stewardess, Sue Wilkins, take passengers on a trip across the moon's Sea of Thirst. This crater filled with moondust seems similar to a lake on Earth, and Selene, like a motorboat, smoothly skims across its surface. By the light of Mother Earth, Selene's passengers are entertained by glorious views of the moon's topography, including the impressive Mountains of Inacces [...]

    10. I need to read this again. (I remember enjoying it very much, but a new read might reveal a new star rating.) I was reminded of it because I was thinking about examples of what I call "No Enemy" books. Books where's there's no bad guys, human or alien, but rather the challenge is against an inhospitable planet or a virus or something. Like The Martian Please tell me of any further examples you know of!

    11. Αν σκέφτεσαι να διαβάσεις αυτό το βιβλίο για κάτι χαλαρό απλά ξανασκέψου τοΔεν έχει σημασία αν έχεις προσωπική ζωή, αν έχεις πράγματα να κάνεις ή αν θες να κοιμηθείς το βράδυ, δεν θα σε αφήσει. Από τα καλύτερα SyFy που έχω διαβάσει, δεν σε αφήνει να ηρεμήσεις ούτε κεφάλαιο, είνα [...]

    12. کل داستان در مورد دفن و نجات یک اتوبوس گردشگری روی ماهه. یه اتّفاق ساده که فقط باید کلارک باشی تا بتونی ازش چنین داستان هیجان‌انگیزی روایت کنی که نفس‌ها رو توی سینه‌ها حبس کنه.

    13. The sea of Thirst. Countless eons have gone into the creation of a sea unlike anything mankind has encountered before. A sea of dust. On the moon. People travel from all across the inhabited systems to board the Selene and travel across that endless sea of lifeless grey dust, but something is stirring beneath the dust. Something that just might cost the lives of all those aboard the Selene.Science marches on. Back when this was written there was a real concern that the surface of the moon might [...]

    14. How serendipitous that I should blog about A Fall of Moondust the morning after the lunar eclipse. In fact, the eclipse was way more impressive. This was the least liked book of Clarke's I've read so far. The plot kept me reading. As usual, the author delves into some philosophical questions about mankind. But the device of a cruiser traveling across the Sea of Thirst on the moon only to become buried in the dust by a moon quake was too much like other such movies/novels: meet the characters, di [...]

    15. No book exists in a vacuum. By that I mean you can't come to a book or story without the history of your own reading or viewing experiences across the same or other genres and in other mediums.For example, my own love and fascination with "Doctor Who." During the second Doctor's era, there were a lot of stories that fell into the category of base under siege. Basically, you had an external threat menacing an isolated group of human beings. It's a fairly simple premise but one that the series wor [...]

    16. It's been such a pleasure to read (well, listen to) these authors that represent standards of Science Fiction. I really enjoy Clarke. Can't wait to really dig into Asimov. I never read this stuff as a kid, but it's a joy to experience now.Also, I particularly enjoy stories in which there's no villain and this is one of them. I kept thinking of The Martian. I have to wonder if Andy Weir consulted this book periodically when writing The Martian.

    17. I read this book as a teenager, reading it again was like meeting an old friend. Still good after all these years.

    18. Not my cup of tea. Solid writing, reads like a movie, and definitely of the optimism of its time. It just didn’t have that something special and surprising that’ll pull some more stars from me.

    19. Arthur C. Clarke is known for bone dry science fiction, so it's only appropriate that he takes us to the Sea of Thirst on the moon, a massive lake of lunar dust traversed by the tourist cruiser Selene. When a sudden burst of lunar activity buries Selene under 15 meters of dust, it's up the passengers and crew to survive until rescue by heroic scientists and engineers.There's some psychological drama among the crew and passengers, as they deal with escalating threats from oxygen starvation to hea [...]

    20. Like its reel counterparts, popcorn literature set in outer space are usually replete with alien invasions, intergalactic skirmishes, and heroes trying to defeat extraterrestrial elements. But there is no written rule saying all works under the genre should have all these checklist items ticked—relying on hard facts, research, and a little bit of forecast will sometimes do just dandy. If done properly, they could even be better than most of those soft sci-fi treats. This dawned on me as I corr [...]

    21. A classically formulaic Moon based disaster thriller. It’s got all the requisite character and plot tropes. All it’s missing is the small child with a dog or an old lady with a cat. Still, you probably can’t have pets residing at a low gravity Moon settlement.It didn’t bowl me over but it was an entertaining quick read.

    22. Before The Martian by Andy Weir, there was A Fall of Moondust by Arthur C. Clarke. I hadn't come across this until Scott mentioned it a while back on A Good Story is Hard to Find podcast. It seemed serendipitous when I received it as a birthday gift from my mother who recently has been rereading her way through the Clarke canon. And I see that Kindle lets Prime subscribers borrow his books free it looks like everything he wrote.The Sea of Thirst is filled with moondust that is so fine it flows [...]

    23. Those minor quibbles don't take anything away from the fact that A Fall of Moondust is a very entertaining read. I guess you need a bit of a taste for hard science fiction to really enjoy this novel, but it is not a technical or on such a grand scale as some of Clarke's other works. Some readers may even feel it lacks the scope of some his other novels, Rendezvous with Rama (1972) comes to mind, or the sheer scale of some of the other engineering projects he describes, for instance in The Founta [...]

    24. As pure science fiction goes, Moondust was pretty solid. Clarke came up with an interesting disaster, the likes of which space exploration might eventually invite. And he came up with some interesting, creative ideas that might really have saved the imperiled protagonists. He wrote up the adventure well; with clarity and humor. But a sweeping space opera, Moondust is not. Nor does this particular story touch on deeper subjects like the human condition and the alterations technology will impose u [...]

    25. Somethings just don't age and a truly well written, science based novel is one of them. Re-read this book after what must be forty years and it was still good. OK some of the attitudes were a little off particularly around the role of women, bit these are just historical anomalies and don't really distract from a cracking good story.Interestingly this book was first published in 1964 well before the moon landings. At one point in the narrative Clarke mentions the fact that from the surface of th [...]

    26. A Fall of Moondust is as much a rescue story as it is a sci-fi story. Set on the moon the novel explores the human condition when it is tested by extreme circumstances. Moment by moment Clarke reveals more of the backstories and motivations of his characters that are both trapped and those that are trying to rescue or take advantage of the situation. The novel was partly inspired by 'moon theory' of the time and, I suspect, also the changing nature of the media and tv news i the 50s and 60s. For [...]

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