The Uncensored War: The Media and Vietnam

The Uncensored War The Media and Vietnam This book was finished in the tenth year after the end of the Vietnam War The year was also the year of Rambo and of a number of other celebration of the Vietnam War in popular culture It was th

  • Title: The Uncensored War: The Media and Vietnam
  • Author: Daniel C. Hallin
  • ISBN: 9780520065437
  • Page: 287
  • Format: Paperback
  • This book was finished in the tenth year after the end of the Vietnam War The year 1985 was also the year of Rambo, and of a number of other celebration of the Vietnam War in popular culture It was the year Congress cut off aid to the Contras in Nicaragua, and then abruptly reversed itself and approved humanitarian aid to support the guerrilla war in that country ThThis book was finished in the tenth year after the end of the Vietnam War The year 1985 was also the year of Rambo, and of a number of other celebration of the Vietnam War in popular culture It was the year Congress cut off aid to the Contras in Nicaragua, and then abruptly reversed itself and approved humanitarian aid to support the guerrilla war in that country The Vietnam Syndrome showed signs of giving way tot he Grenada Syndrome the fear of repeating the Vietnam experience showed signs of giving way to a desire to relive it in an idealized form The nation seemed deeply confused about its identity as an actor in world politics, and thus particularly vulnerable to appealing myths So it is a good time to take a sober look back and the nation s consciousness during the Vietnam War itself which as we shall see, despite the popular image of an independent media demolishing the nation s illusions, was also governed by a powerful mythology, born in part out of the traumas of earlier wars.

    One thought on “The Uncensored War: The Media and Vietnam”

    1. Hallin does an excellent job puncturing the myth that the media--newspaper and television--was hostile to the war in Vietnam, and hence, to some degree responsible for its failure. The hostile media theory holds no water up until the Tet offensive in 1968 and is a relatively small piece of a larger complicated picture thereafter. The book is divided into two sections, the first focusing on coverage of the war in the "liberal" New York Times up to 1965, the point at which reasonably complete arch [...]

    2. I really found this book quite useful as a reference tool concerning media representations during the Vietnam War. I wish the study had actually gone a little bit further in its chronology, looking at how exactly the news stations chose to depict the fall of Saigon.

    3. Excellent argument for why the media did not lose the Vietnam War. Now I have to write a real review about it.

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