Granta 121: The Best of Young Brazilian Novelists

Granta The Best of Young Brazilian Novelists Since Granta s inaugural list of the Best of Young British Novelists in featuring Salman Rushdie Ian McEwan Kazuo Ishiguro Martin Amis and Julian Barnes the Best of Young issues have been some

  • Title: Granta 121: The Best of Young Brazilian Novelists
  • Author: John Freeman
  • ISBN: 9781905881635
  • Page: 169
  • Format: Paperback
  • Since Granta s inaugural list of the Best of Young British Novelists in 1983 featuring Salman Rushdie, Ian McEwan, Kazuo Ishiguro, Martin Amis and Julian Barnes the Best of Young issues have been some of the magazine s most influential and best selling In 2010, Granta looked beyond the English speaking world with Best of Young Spanish Language Novelists.Now, in an issSince Granta s inaugural list of the Best of Young British Novelists in 1983 featuring Salman Rushdie, Ian McEwan, Kazuo Ishiguro, Martin Amis and Julian Barnes the Best of Young issues have been some of the magazine s most influential and best selling In 2010, Granta looked beyond the English speaking world with Best of Young Spanish Language Novelists.Now, in an issue fully translated in partnership with Granta em Portugu s, the magazine celebrates emerging talent from Brazil, many translated into English for the first time Authors include Cristhiano Aguiar, Vanessa Barbara, Carol Bensimon, Javier Arancibia Contreras, J.P Cuenca, Miguel del Castillo, Laura Erber, Emilio Fraia, Julian Fuks, Daniel Galera, Luisa Geisler, Vinicius Jatoba, Michel Laub, Tatiana Salem Levy, Ricardo Lisias, Chico Mattoso, Antonio Prata, Carola Saavendra, Leandro Sarmatz, and Antonio Xerxenesky.Plus look for candid interviews, exclusive podcasts, and interactive features, which allow readers to comment on current and past issues, on our website, granta.

    One thought on “Granta 121: The Best of Young Brazilian Novelists”

    1. Some good pieces in this edition including "Animals" by Michel Laub, "Evo Morales" by Ricardo Lisias, "The Dinner" (the tension of the past is ever present and rising) by Julian Fuks, "Valdir Peres, Juanito and Poloskei" by Antonio Prata, "Tomorrow, upon Awakening" by Antonio Xerenesky, "Lion" (disturbing) by Luisa Geisler, "Before the Fall" by J.P. Cuena, "Still Life" by Vinicius Jatoba, and "Apnoea" by Daniel Galena. I like when Granta does these best of young novelists editions. Not sure that [...]

    2. A goer when the writing stops explaining things in concrete, well-crafted sentences. When it's trying to be important, I'm reminded of Amis' hilarious essay somewhere on amateur writing contests ("The sun was bakingly hot.") Now, where to go from here, after reading the good stuff? I found myself slightly beside myself at the future for me and Brazilian literature in English. The dialogue in "Apnoeia," for example, almost reads itself aloud, and "Still Life" is oblique and welcomely unaccommodat [...]

    3. As a Portuguese to English translator I was thrilled to see this edition and positive about the prospect of introducing more readers to contemporary Brazilian writing. Unfortunately none of the selected pieces really jumped out and moved me (the way so much writing of Brazil has over the past few years).

    4. All prosperity and the accompanying dark secrets.Daniel Galera's "Apnoea", "That Wind Blowing Through the Plaza" by Laura Erber, and Javier Arancibia Contreras' "Rat Fever" are standouts.

    5. Granta 121: The Best Of Young Brazilian Novelists edited by John Freeman was first published in autumn of 2012 and I thought it might offer a nice introduction to modern Brazilian society. That is if that is at all possible, since it is, as Jorge Amado said “not a country, but a continent,” huge, diverse in race and social standing. Like all collections there will be hits and misses for me as a reader, but there were quite a few stories that made the grade in my opinion. The book is organize [...]

    6. Granta 121, The Best of Young Brazilian Novelists, is an anthology of stories from some of the best-known young novelists in Brazil. The collection is worth reading for the view it offers of Brazilian literary culture, which is not exactly readily accessible in the U.S and these four outstanding stories: "Animals," by Michel Laub, a flash-fiction like recounting of the deaths of the narrator's pets, friends, and, most meaningfully, his father; "Evo Morales," Ricardo Lísias' hilarious story abou [...]

    7. I love Latin American literature, but I am mainly acquainted with classic authors like Marquez, Llosa, Amadu, Aliende. I was curious to make a "reality check". Definitely it was different - more cosmopolitan feeling, the contemporary themes of our European lives. My prepared expectation for exotic reality was not satisfied But I can say the writers are pretty good if you approach the thing without a fixed idea. I really enjoyed "Blazing Sun" (Tatiana Levy), "Evo Morales" (Ricardo Lisias), "Valdi [...]

    8. Kind of conflicted about this issue, mainly because I have no connection to Brazilian writers.So much sad, dissociated, in touch with surroundings/buildings/cultural ways and means, so much of families broken, new people coming in, "things" sold and recovered, relationships included.Not one of my favorite Grantas, but that's a function of my ignorance.

    9. I only read about half the stories, which was enough for me. Not that they were bad, but the rest I can pick at, or not, at a later date.Before the Fall, describing high-flying Rio before an imagined (and likely) bubble burst later this decade, is a real treat. As is Evo Morales, a kind of surrealist journey into an jokey obsession that turns into a kind of mental illness.

    10. Disappointing read. None of the writings really evoked Brazil in a way I expected them to. I'm a great lover of Jorge Amado; I love the intertwining of the real with the surreal, the mysticism, sensuality and exoticism in his writings. Maybe I was expecting too much!

    11. An uneven collection which improved towards the end. The stand out stories for me were Jatoba's 'Still Life' and Fraia's 'A Temporary Stay'.

    12. Authors I liked the best in here: Michel Laub, Cristhiano Aguiar, Julian Fuks, Antonio Xerxenesky, Javier Arancibia Contreras, J.P. Cuenca, and Vinicius Jatoba.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *