The Red Brush: Writing Women of Imperial China

The Red Brush Writing Women of Imperial China One of the most exciting recent developments in the study of Chinese literature has been the rediscovery of an extremely rich and diverse tradition of women s writing of the imperial period B C E

  • Title: The Red Brush: Writing Women of Imperial China
  • Author: Wilt L. Idema Beata Grant
  • ISBN: 9780674013933
  • Page: 470
  • Format: Paperback
  • One of the most exciting recent developments in the study of Chinese literature has been the rediscovery of an extremely rich and diverse tradition of women s writing of the imperial period 221 B.C.E 1911 C.E Many of these writings are of considerable literary quality Others provide us with moving insights into the lives and feelings of a surprisingly diverse group oOne of the most exciting recent developments in the study of Chinese literature has been the rediscovery of an extremely rich and diverse tradition of women s writing of the imperial period 221 B.C.E 1911 C.E Many of these writings are of considerable literary quality Others provide us with moving insights into the lives and feelings of a surprisingly diverse group of women living in Confucian China, a society that perhaps than any other is known for its patriarchal tradition.Because of the burgeoning interest in the study of both premodern and modern women in China, several scholarly books, articles, and even anthologies of women s poetry have been published in the last two decades This anthology differs from previous works by offering a glimpse of women s writings not only in poetry but in other genres as well, including essays and letters, drama, religious writing, and narrative fiction.The authors have presented the selections within their respective biographical and historical contexts This comprehensive approach helps to clarify traditional Chinese ideas on the nature and function of literature as well as on the role of the woman writer.

    One thought on “The Red Brush: Writing Women of Imperial China”

    1. 4.5/5It's true enough that poems and books cannot stave off hunger,But if I threw away my poems and books, I wouldn't have a life.-Wang Duanshu (1621-1685), 'When My Woman Friend Dong Dasurou Came for a Visit, There Was No Cooked Food'The only real reason for the half-star difference between my pictorial rating and my numerical is it serves the useful function of reminding me to come back to this topic, if not this particular work, with a lot more know-how under my belt. When will this happen? I [...]

    2. Initially when I got the book it was only due to the fact that it was required for a class that I was in. After studying Chinese for years however this is the first book that I have seen to actively document the famous women of imperial China onward. Not only does the book give you an active insight into what life was like for a woman in China, it also catalogs the numerous changes that occurred within China. Unique perspectives and language that is very easy to follow. Anyone curious about Chin [...]

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