Sins Against Science: The Scientific Media Hoaxes of Poe, Twain, and Others

Sins Against Science The Scientific Media Hoaxes of Poe Twain and Others Lynda Walsh explores a provocative era in American history the proliferation of fake news stories about scientific and technological discoveries from to These hoaxes which fooled thousands

  • Title: Sins Against Science: The Scientific Media Hoaxes of Poe, Twain, and Others
  • Author: Lynda Walsh
  • ISBN: 9780791468777
  • Page: 472
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Lynda Walsh explores a provocative era in American history the proliferation of fake news stories about scientific and technological discoveries from 1830 to 1880 These hoaxes, which fooled thousands of readers, offer a first hand look at an intriguing guerilla tactic in the historical struggle between arts and sciences in America Focusing on the hoaxes of Richard AdamsLynda Walsh explores a provocative era in American history the proliferation of fake news stories about scientific and technological discoveries from 1830 to 1880 These hoaxes, which fooled thousands of readers, offer a first hand look at an intriguing guerilla tactic in the historical struggle between arts and sciences in America Focusing on the hoaxes of Richard Adams Locke, Edgar Allan Poe, Mark Twain, and Dan De Quille, the author combines rhetorical hermeneutics, linguistic pragmatics, and reader response theory to answer three primary questions How did the hoaxes work What were the hoaxers trying to accomplish And what is a hoax

    One thought on “Sins Against Science: The Scientific Media Hoaxes of Poe, Twain, and Others”

    1. Admission: this review will not be fair.Lynda Walsh is a professor of English and primarily interested in rhetoric, its theory and practice. I don't really care about that topic. What interests me is what she applies her rhetorician skills to understanding: a vogue for scientific hoaxes in the middle third of the nineteenth century. Mostly, then, I am reading against her primary interests. Which means much of the book is of little interest to me--and, indeed, from my perspective tends to obscure [...]

    2. This book is well-researched, insightful, measured, and clear. Okay, some of the linguistics bits stumped me, but Walsh does explain them -- I just didn't bother reading the technical explanation closely because I don't need to understand it and I'm a strategic reader these days.In general, this is an excellent scholarly examination of science-related hoaxes.

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