Elizabeth, the Queen Mother

Elizabeth the Queen Mother Harold Nicolson called her the greatest Queen since Cleopatra while Cecil Beaton called her a marshmallow made on a welding machine Stephen Tennant said She looked everything that she was not gentle

  • Title: Elizabeth, the Queen Mother
  • Author: Hugo Vickers
  • ISBN: 9780099476627
  • Page: 176
  • Format: Paperback
  • Harold Nicolson called her the greatest Queen since Cleopatra , while Cecil Beaton called her a marshmallow made on a welding machine Stephen Tennant said She looked everything that she was not gentle, gullible, tenderness mingled with dispassionate serenity, cool, well bred, remote Behind this veil she schemed and vacillated, hard as nails Who was she The QueenHarold Nicolson called her the greatest Queen since Cleopatra , while Cecil Beaton called her a marshmallow made on a welding machine Stephen Tennant said She looked everything that she was not gentle, gullible, tenderness mingled with dispassionate serenity, cool, well bred, remote Behind this veil she schemed and vacillated, hard as nails Who was she The Queen Mother s story has not yet been properly told This was partly due to her long life, and the difficulty that always exists when a biography of a living person is attempted, partly because she was a queen and the real person gets hidden behind the perceived image and partly because she is hard to pin down.From her privileged aristocratic childhood, to the Abdication and the problems with Diana this book questions how she faced her challenges and crises, assesses her role, how powerful she was, and how she coped This is a candid, personal portrait of one of Britain s most loved national treasures.Hugo Vickers, an acknowledged expert on the House of Windsor, has spent seventeen years researching this book, and observed the Queen Mother in public and private over a period of forty years.

    One thought on “Elizabeth, the Queen Mother”

    1. What should have been a fascinating, easy read soon became a chore. Far too many footnotes, irrelevant detail (it seems the author felt obliged to provide extensive background information on everyone who came within a yard of QEQM and gleefully relished the opportunity to regurgitate decades old gossip) and utilises a timeline which, as Doctor Who would say, is "wibbly wobbly". Jumping backwards and forth through time isn't normally a problem but as royal titles are inherited and interchange it [...]

    2. Hugo Vickers stays just on the right side of the line between biography and hagiography in his book - but only by a whisker. It is a fact-dense, meticulous and highly structured look in to the life of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother. What is interesting to me about the book is that the first half is a very flattering portrait indeed (flattering perhaps by omission, rather than any attempt to airbrush or create opacity). However in the book’s second half (and the latter years of her life), in [...]

    3. A really amazing life - the times she lived through! She was very sympbolically important during the Second World War and a motherly figure to the British people for many decades. But, I can't say it was a good book. The author seemed to be really impressed by titles, awards and who people's great-great-grandfather's were. I know that's inherent to any royal biography, but he was obsessed. It left the impression that the Queen Mother liked to have superficial interactoins with the common people [...]

    4. Dense. Packed with every detail you could ever wish or need to know about the most incredible royal consort who always happened to be the most of them all given her incredible family tree. She was the picture of stiff upper lip but laced with Scottish grace and warmth. I loved this book and whilst some of the names sailed right over my head I was thrilled to see everything included. Even if you are not a royalist, I bet you'll find this a fascinating read.

    5. One of the most remarkable women to have ever been Queen Consort. Far smarter than anyone thought she looked, tough as nails, she was precisely the right woman in the right place when her husband became King George VI. Hitler called her the most dangerous woman in Europe. It's pretty clear to see that England's current Queen inherited a lot of her mother's steely determination and smarts.

    6. Far to difficult to read. Put it down so many times to read other books I finally had to force myself to finish it. I am without a doubt a true monarchist and was really looking forward to this book. Very disappointed. Gave it away so it no longer remains on my bookshelves.

    7. I only could read less than half this book before I had to put it down. This book reads like a report with nothing really to liven it up. It's uninteresting the way it is written. I wouldn't recommend this book at all.

    8. Incredible sweep of history! OMG did they really drink that much ALL the time?! The Queen Mum is painted as a saint, which feels a little fake, but this was a terrific read anyway.

    9. Great read, and look into the 20th century in England. I think perhaps I'm done with this time period for a while

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