Reflections on the Way to the Gallows: Rebel Women in Prewar Japan

Reflections on the Way to the Gallows Rebel Women in Prewar Japan In this book for the first time we can hear the startling moving voices of adventurous and rebellious Japanese women as they eloquently challenged the social repression of prewar Japan The extraord

  • Title: Reflections on the Way to the Gallows: Rebel Women in Prewar Japan
  • Author: Mikiso Hane
  • ISBN: 9780679722731
  • Page: 488
  • Format: Paperback
  • In this book, for the first time, we can hear the startling, moving voices of adventurous and rebellious Japanese women as they eloquently challenged the social repression of prewar Japan The extraordinary women whose memoirs, recollections, and essays are presented here constitute a strong current in the history of modern Japanese life from the 1880s to the outbreak of tIn this book, for the first time, we can hear the startling, moving voices of adventurous and rebellious Japanese women as they eloquently challenged the social repression of prewar Japan The extraordinary women whose memoirs, recollections, and essays are presented here constitute a strong current in the history of modern Japanese life from the 1880s to the outbreak of the Pacific War.

    One thought on “Reflections on the Way to the Gallows: Rebel Women in Prewar Japan”

    1. As it happens, only one of these pieces, the one that inspired the title, was composed on the way to the gallows, but they are nonetheless heartbreaking. This is the largely untold story of Japanese women demonstrating and organizing for workers' rights in the early part of the last century, including the rise of the ultra-nationalists. These women are forthright and refreshingly opinionated, most of them rose from deep poverty, of both the rural and the urban varieties. They were variously inte [...]

    2. I'm only half through with the book and it's knocking my socks off. Page 122 Chapter 4: Fumiko Kaneko : The Road to Nihilism. In her death row interview. What is your opinion concerning the Japanese state and social system? Paraphrasing, her answer. I divide the Japanese state-social system into three levels: The first class is the royal-clan members. The second class is the government ministers and other wielders of political power. The third class in the masses in general. The royal clan lives [...]

    3. Important primary materials on women figures who often get dropped from social, cultural, and intellectual histories of modern Japan. In a discipline where Kotoku Shusui remains the name invoked in narratives on the Great Treason Incident (while Kanno Suga' testimony is where the meat is), this is a necessary work. Now, if only we could construct a history of radical critique in Japan that synthesizes men and women. After all, many were intimate (oh yes, very intimate) comrades at the time.Proba [...]

    4. Every book needs a dissenting opinion. While I am glad I read this book, I think its shortcomings overshadow its strengths.Hane's introductions and summaries of the lives of the women featured in this book are the best parts, because they are concise. The tedious parts are reading the diaries themselves; the gems in them few and far between. I think Hane should have selected more women to cover, written more bios, and more aggressively edited their diaries.

    5. Rich use of primary sources to allow the voices of early twentieth century anarchist and social martyrs to be heard again.

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