The Little Book of Scientific Principles, Theories and Things

The Little Book of Scientific Principles Theories and Things The Little Book of Scientific Principles Theories Things explains laws principles equations theories and things that form the foundations of science It features all the great names in science

  • Title: The Little Book of Scientific Principles, Theories and Things
  • Author: Surendra Verma
  • ISBN: 9781402738708
  • Page: 397
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Little Book of Scientific Principles, Theories, Things explains 175 laws, principles, equations, theories and things that form the foundations of science It features all the great names in science, including Pythagoras, Galileo, Newton, Darwin, and Einstein, as well as recent contributors such as Rachel Carson, James Lovelock, and Stephen Hawking.This littlThe Little Book of Scientific Principles, Theories, Things explains 175 laws, principles, equations, theories and things that form the foundations of science It features all the great names in science, including Pythagoras, Galileo, Newton, Darwin, and Einstein, as well as recent contributors such as Rachel Carson, James Lovelock, and Stephen Hawking.This little book presents serious science simply, answering questions like What is Pythagorean Theorem What is the difference between circadian rhythms and the popular concept of biorhythms What is Hawking s Black Hole Theory Who developed the World Wide Web

    One thought on “The Little Book of Scientific Principles, Theories and Things”

    1. A fun and interesting light read. The author sums up, as the title says, over 175 'scientific principles, theories, and things' from the 6th century BC to the 21st century (it was published in 2005.)I'd have given it more stars, but I caught a significant error in a subject I know, which makes me wonder whether there are more in areas I don't know as well (he described the hydrogen isotope tritium as having 2 protons and one neutron. He got protons and neutrons backward - two protons would make [...]

    2. The timeline is really well explained and very useful, but the descriptions aren't as insightful as you'd expect sometimes.

    3. The chronology makes the material much more interesting than it would be if arranged according to a plan of, say, like principles of mathematics. At first I didn't like how short all the references were, but then I realized that I would likely not have kept on reading if the entries had been longer. And since I read it I have realized how many references in the world I had been missing - in particular, the Turing test must have come across my path now a dozen times since I have finished the book [...]

    4. I enjoyed this book. It's concise and easy to read. At times, it also offers a glimpse into some fascinating lives. A fun little science book to have. It's a good "spring-board" book, where you get a little bit of information on a person/scientific principles and want to go off and learn more.

    5. This is a difficult book to read, but not for the usual reasons. First of all, the collection of items is brilliant. For that Mr. Verma gets 4*. But the discussions are all over the map ranging from mediocre to abominable. I should caveat this by saying I am a physicist and so I am holding the content to my standard of discussion. Mr. Verma's discussion may be good for a non-scientist but I cannot rate that and I also cannot give the hypothesis much credence. So for content he gets 0*. One of th [...]

    6. Don't expect to actually learn anything scientific from this book. It consists of one page summaries of scientific discoveries over the past 2000 years.What it does do is make you aware of the amazing strides man has made in understanding the world. Its beyond imagining the ingenuity these scientists/thinkers had in being able to observe the workings of the universe.

    7. This book was very interesting and informative. It shows many great discoveries. My favorite of these is Nuclear Fission, discovered 1938 in Germany. "The Uranium nucleus, after absorbing a neutron, had split into two roughly equal pieces, Barium and Krypton" also, when the atomic number is even, it is a stable element. when the atomic number is odd, is is an unstable, radioactive element.

    8. This book was really a finding. With short description of many scientific achievements ordered as a time line this book was a real pleasure to be read. You can read one or two pages every now and then, and at the end you have the big picture of science throughout human history.

    9. Very good book, although has only a small detail about subjects addressed it can good tip for initial search for great science range.

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