The Heart of Princess Osra

The Heart of Princess Osra Hope was a barrister who gave up the law after realizing success with his novel The Prisoner of Zenda The book begins Stephen Stephen Stephen The impatient cry was heard through all the narrow gl

  • Title: The Heart of Princess Osra
  • Author: Anthony Hope
  • ISBN: 9781417912469
  • Page: 264
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1895 Hope was a barrister who gave up the law after realizing success with his novel The Prisoner of Zenda The book begins Stephen Stephen Stephen The impatient cry was heard through all the narrow gloomy street, where the old richly carved house fronts bowed to meet one another and left for the eye s comfort only a bare glimpse of blue It was, men said, the oldest str1895 Hope was a barrister who gave up the law after realizing success with his novel The Prisoner of Zenda The book begins Stephen Stephen Stephen The impatient cry was heard through all the narrow gloomy street, where the old richly carved house fronts bowed to meet one another and left for the eye s comfort only a bare glimpse of blue It was, men said, the oldest street in Strelsau, even as the sign of the Silver Ship was the oldest sign known to exist in the city For when Aaron Lazarus the Jew came there, seventy years before, he had been the tenth man in unbroken line that took up the business and now Stephen Nados, his apprentice and successor, was the eleventh See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

    One thought on “The Heart of Princess Osra”

    1. I read many very bad reviews of this one before trying it. And I have to say that they've all been true. Fictional 1800's Europe has never disappointed me more. I will recommend this book only for people who want to read the Prisoner of Zenda, the second book in this series. But, please, please, PLEASE read it only if you have the slightly crazy OCD of reading a whole series properly so that your brain doesn't scream at you. If you don't, thank the lords and read book two right away and leave th [...]

    2. This Zenda prequel is written well enough but still fairly unlikeable. Osra is young, a little vain, and constantly besieged by men who've been literally driven insane by her beauty. There's only one case where she directly participates in something unkind, but the whole set of stories are treated as some kind of moral lesson about her love life, as if it's Osra's fault men keep kidnapping, menacing, or threatening to kill themselves over her.

    3. A bit on the misogynistic side, with the Princess paying emotionally for not understanding love. But also quite violent, as many of the men pay for the Princess's mistakes with their lives. Also lacks the wit of Prisoner of Zenda, with few of the characters being likable. Osra's brother Rudolf is particularly crudely drawn.

    4. An amazing companion to the Prisoner of Zenda and its sequel, this book contains short stories about a princess who lives about a century before the famous events of Zenda. I only wish I read this while I was still at school, when I studied the Zenda novel!

    5. This book is so depressing that it's actually funny! In every chapter, another poor man is dying, being murdered, committing suicide, going insane, about to be hanged as a criminal, or dying of some horrific illness because his heart is breaking for love of the beautiful Princess Osra. All these poor stupid men, dying because the Princess is beautiful. It's tragic and funny in its ridiculousness. (I mean, how beautiful could she be? She's Helen of Troy, apparently.)I love how chivalrous the nobl [...]

    6. a series of short romances, revolving around the pulchritudinous Princess Osra of Ruritania and the many, many people who fall in love with her, that she falls in love with, or who try to sneak a kiss to win a bet. the writing is of the standard you'd expect from Hope, but the plots are a little uninspiring and most of the characters are both boring and mildly dislikeable. except the Bishop of Modenstein, a wonderful Aramis-like figure who appears to save the day or offer advice. he hints at a m [...]

    7. This novel, a prequel to "The Prisoner of Zenda" which establishes some of the kingdom of Ruritania's history, is the weakest (and most politically incorrect) of the Ruritania trilogy. Osra is beautiful and intelligent, but knows nothing of love. Despite this, every man she meets falls madly for her, and most of them end up dying by their own hand for it- a fact which would feel like a running joke if it were not treated with such solemn, respectful dignity. Will she ever learn humanity to go wi [...]

    8. Anthony Hope had mastered his inimitable style by the time he wrote this series of short stories. There's still a lot of rather blithe blood and guts (in the swashbuckling sense) but his wit and heart shine. And we even get to see a heroic Hentzau--a priest, yet!It is set during an earlier time in Ruritania's history, as the beautiful Princess Osra is courted, and trifles with men's hearts, then learns the consequences. By the time she finally falls in love, she's been dealt some sharp lessons.I [...]

    9. For Clare: This was great! Really, it didn't hold a candle to "Prisoner" and "Rupert" but it was still a fun read with a perfectly applicable modern message and plenty of fun & adventure thrown in. I read it on my phone, free from google books (and they also have many, many other nigh on unobtainable Anthony Hope's that I plan on getting into). Thanks for helping me remember Hope & find this one!

    10. Entertaining, but repetitive. Clear Victorian era writing with the scanned illustrations showing late 1800's attire while the story setting was supposed to be 1730s or earlier. Interesting and little twists in the story endings made it delightful to read.

    11. A beautiful collection of short stories, revolving around the central character of Princess Osra, that are combined together into a novel. Each story is full of passion and adventure, and the reader will be glued to each and every page.

    12. Not really a novel, just a series of linked short stories about the different men who fell in love with Princess Osra. Mildly entertaining, but no match for the Prisoner of Zenda and Rupert of Hentzau.

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