Ape to Apollo: Aesthetics and the Idea of Race in the 18th Century

Ape to Apollo Aesthetics and the Idea of Race in the th Century Ape to Apollo is the first book to follow the development in the eighteenth century of the idea of race as it shaped and was shaped by the idea of aesthetics Twelve full color illustrations and sixty

  • Title: Ape to Apollo: Aesthetics and the Idea of Race in the 18th Century
  • Author: David Bindman
  • ISBN: 9780801440854
  • Page: 269
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Ape to Apollo is the first book to follow the development in the eighteenth century of the idea of race as it shaped and was shaped by the idea of aesthetics Twelve full color illustrations and sixty five black and white illustrations from publications and artists of the day allow the reader to see eighteenth century concepts of race translated into images Human varietiApe to Apollo is the first book to follow the development in the eighteenth century of the idea of race as it shaped and was shaped by the idea of aesthetics Twelve full color illustrations and sixty five black and white illustrations from publications and artists of the day allow the reader to see eighteenth century concepts of race translated into images Human varieties are marked in such illustrations by exaggerated differences, with emphases on variations from the European ideal and on the characteristics that allegedly divided the races In surveying the idea of human variety before race was introduced by Linneaus as a scientific category, David Bindman considers the work of many German and British thinkers, including J F Blumenbach, Georg and Johann Reinhold Forster, and Immanuel Kant, as well as Georges Louis Leclerc Buffon and Pieter Camper Bindman believes that such representations, and the theories that supported them, helped give rise to the racism of the modern era He writes, It may be objected that some features of modern racism predate the Enlightenment, and already existed in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries certainly there was deep prejudice, but that, I would argue, is not the same as racism, which must have as a foundation a theory of race to justify the exercise of prejudice.

    One thought on “Ape to Apollo: Aesthetics and the Idea of Race in the 18th Century”

    1. The way scientists, since at least the eighteenth century, deceived both their public and themselves with pretentions to scientific objectivity, as they presented obviously self-serving claims of European racial superiority is at once fascinating, disheartening, and funny. Until recently, the most definitive book on this was The Mismeasure of Man by Stephen J. Gould, who certainly knew how play up both the tragic and comic sides of this story. In retrospect, however, Gould's account seems to be [...]

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