When Sex Goes to School: Warring Views on Sex--and Sex Education--Since the Sixties

When Sex Goes to School Warring Views on Sex and Sex Education Since the Sixties A chronicle of the two decades that noted sociologist Kristin Luker spent following parents in four America communities engaged in a passionate war of ideas and values When Sex Goes to School explore

  • Title: When Sex Goes to School: Warring Views on Sex--and Sex Education--Since the Sixties
  • Author: Kristin Luker
  • ISBN: 9780393329964
  • Page: 366
  • Format: Paperback
  • A chronicle of the two decades that noted sociologist Kristin Luker spent following parents in four America communities engaged in a passionate war of ideas and values, When Sex Goes to School explores a conflict with stakes that are deceptively simple and painfully personal For these parents, the question of how their children should be taught about sex cuts far deeper tA chronicle of the two decades that noted sociologist Kristin Luker spent following parents in four America communities engaged in a passionate war of ideas and values, When Sex Goes to School explores a conflict with stakes that are deceptively simple and painfully personal For these parents, the question of how their children should be taught about sex cuts far deeper than politics, religion, or even friendship The drama of this book comes from watching the exceptionally thoughtful Luker try to figure sex education out Judith Shulevitz, New York Times Book Review In doing so, Luker also traces the origins of sex education from the turn of the century hygienist movement to the marriage obsessed 1950s and the sexual and gender upheavals of the 1960s Her unexpected conclusions make it impossible to look at the intersections of the private and the political in the same way.

    One thought on “When Sex Goes to School: Warring Views on Sex--and Sex Education--Since the Sixties”

    1. First, my critiques1-LGBT voices and discussions are absent. The book was published in the early 2000's. In 2014, it is already out of date. Gay marriage and the major shift in attitudes toward LGBT identities means the dialog over sex ed has also had also undergone a shift. We know LGBT teams are at a much higher risk of bullying and suicide. Gay marriage is becoming more common as more states adopt marriage equality-something that has pucked up speed in the last two in particular. The debate o [...]

    2. I thought this book would be more history-driven, as in information on what sex education has been like over the various decades, but instead, it is basically a long, repetitive research paper on the difference factions in America who are pro and against comprehensive sex education and why they each feel the way they do. It was very dry and academic in diction. The best part of the whole book was when the author briefly commented about a trip overseas to find out how Sweden and France handled se [...]

    3. This was a slow read that draws a very unrealistic conclusion. I was surprised to see her (modest) support of abstinence-only programs and befuddled by her expectations that sex ed. curricula (which she admits are fragmented in nature and implementation generally) would expand to include the history of the 60s-70s women's movement & sexual revolution. I can't imagine this being a successful point of compromise. Also, frustratingly, this book focuses almost exclusively on heterosexual marriag [...]

    4. This book, while it covers the history of sex education in the schools since the early 20th century, is more about the players on both sides of the issue, about how and why they believe as they do. Luker frames the debate as one between conservatives and liberals, though, in my view, I'd say it's more of a debate between libertarians and authoritarians, as this topic doesn't always fall neatly along a liberal/conservative continnuum. But for the purposes of this review, I'll use Luker's categori [...]

    5. I'll state this from the beginning: I am very much what Kristin Luker refers to in this book as a "sexual liberal". I came into this book with the position that sex, between unmarried people or people of the same gender or even between adolescents, was not harmful or immoral provided that everyone involved was informed and consenting and conscientious. That's my conviction as much as a citizen as an educator. This book illustrates clearly that, though many people agree with me, there are many wh [...]

    6. Luker doesn't bother to ask any whether or not sexuality is “actually” good or bad, or whether pregnancy is, or even whether protection is. The main point of this book is that sex education in the U.S. is necessarily diverse (as we are diverse), and decisions about sex ed are moral and political decisions. To make an argument that pregnancy might be positive for Latinas because it motivates them in school is as useless as the myriad arguments that have already made their way through about th [...]

    7. Rather more interesting that I expected. Luker uses academic language to describe her survey and its results but in a surprisingly accessible way.Well-balanced analysis granting all the different sides in the debate legitimacy. I mean by the time I finished the book I could understand, even if I didn't agree with, the ones arguing against any sex-ed, limited sex-ed, and comprehensive sex-ed. I think Luker makes a very good case that part of the reason the battles get so heated with such little a [...]

    8. Interesting history overview and anecdata, though her conclusions were really surprising. I was really confused when she said that European countries like Sweden and France might someday look to America's sex education model as the standard, especially after going over how secular they were earlier in the same chapter - even with immigrants bringing more "traditional" values to the table, the terrains are very different. Also, it seemed that the page time between those who opposed comprehensive [...]

    9. hmmm.Kristin Luker gave a talk in the east bay last friday, and I really wanted to ask her some questions about this book. (but not enough to pay $65 to get in).Overall, this book does things I think are important. It humanizes both sides of the abstinence only vs. comprehensive sex ed debate, explaining the thought process and value systems behind each side. The comprehensive sex ed side (in my opinion) was not as well explained, but maybe that's just because it's the side I know more about. I [...]

    10. This book really impressed me because it looks into the root causes of peoples' differing viewpoints rather than being about actual battles over sex education in school. She sees peoples' true division as being over things such as the security a hierarchy provides versus the choices that equality opens up. Very interesting and highly recommended. Even the footnotes provide interesting theories.

    11. What an interesting look into the reason we are the way we are. Throughout the entire book you will find yourself comparing your views and values to those of the authors and the interviewees. This book outlines the two sexual education movement in the US and how they affect one's belief system. This review does not give justice to the depth that Luker goes to to uncover the controvercies of sexaul education.

    12. This book does an excellent job laying out the various facets of the sex education debate. I appreciate the author's concluding message that being open and honest with our children in discussing the debate itself as well as the history of sexual revolution in the United States may be one of the best ways to educate them about sex.

    13. Awesome book, but not so much about sex education as about conservative and liberal views on sex and the historical background behind them. Luker is unbiased and leaves the reader of a better understanding of both sides of the issue. Overall, an insightful book for any American to read.

    14. I had to return this book before I read the whole thing, but I really enjoyed what I did read. Something I will read again so I can retain more than what I already did.

    15. I did some research for Kristin Luker while I was at Berkeley. Very interesting for anyone interested in the subject.

    16. This is the book we used as our textbook for Sociology of Sexuality. It really was not a bad read and it didn't have the textbook feel to it. It told a story.

    17. The beginning of this book is interesting, but it starts to get old after the first few chapters. It would have been better as an article rather than an entire book.

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