Looking At the Moon

Looking At the Moon Norah an English war guest living with the wealthy Ogilvie family in Toronto can hardly wait for August She ll spend it at the Ogilvie s lavish cottage in Muskoka a whole month of freedom swimming

  • Title: Looking At the Moon
  • Author: Kit Pearson
  • ISBN: 9780143056355
  • Page: 112
  • Format: Paperback
  • Norah, an English war guest living with the wealthy Ogilvie family in Toronto, can hardly wait for August She ll spend it at the Ogilvie s lavish cottage in Muskoka a whole month of freedom, swimming, adventures with her cousins But this isn t an ordinary summer It s 1943, and the war is still going on Sometimes Norah can t even remember what her parents look likNorah, an English war guest living with the wealthy Ogilvie family in Toronto, can hardly wait for August She ll spend it at the Ogilvie s lavish cottage in Muskoka a whole month of freedom, swimming, adventures with her cousins But this isn t an ordinary summer It s 1943, and the war is still going on Sometimes Norah can t even remember what her parents look like she hasn t seen them in three years And she has turned thirteen, which means life seems to be getting complicated.Then a distant Ogilvie cousin, Andrew, arrives He is nineteen, handsome, intelligent, and Norah thinks she may be falling in love for the first time But Andrew has his own problems he doesn t want to fight in the war, and yet he knows it s what his family and friends expect of him.What the two of them learn from each other makes for a gentle, moving story, the second book in a trilogy that began with the award winning The Sky Is Falling.

    One thought on “Looking At the Moon”

    1. Out of all three books in this trilogy, this book is my favourite. I can really relate to Norah.Norah is a strong brave girl who is doing immaculately well in her situation. She is inspiring.

    2. I may have read this during a slight fever-induced haze, but I definitely adored this one. While the first novel in this trilogy The Sky Is Falling is more of the historical fiction I expect, this one is the perfect follow-up to the characters and their development. Kit Pearson is fan-freaking-tastic and I should've read her sooner. Also, I love how Pearson slides in that authentic Canadian feel without it being overdone. The descriptions, the nature, that landscape; so much of that called to me [...]

    3. It’s been three years since Norah and Gavin moved from England to Canada to live with the Ogilvie’s during the war. Now it’s 1943 and though things have turned around for the Allies, no one knows when the war is going to end. While there are a lot of bad things about leaving England, like missing her family, the best thing is being able to spend summers at the Ogilvie’s summerhouse in Muskoka. At thirteen, Norah seems to be stuck in-between: not quite a child or a teen-ager, and not quit [...]

    4. Okay, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Usually I'm not one for historical fiction, but Kit Pearson didn't try to drown you in facts about the war- she gave you an interesting look onto the life of a war guest living in Canada during World War II. It's the second book in a trilogy- following "The Sky is Following", and after "Looking at the Moon" came "And the Lights Go On Again." I have read all three books, and I can honestly say that this one was definitely my favorite. Norah is only thirteen y [...]

    5. This book brought up so many emotions for me. For one thing, I remember reading the first book in this trilogy years ago and enjoying it. Secondly, now that I live on the other side of the country this book brings about a bit of homesickness as I remember all of the towns and places that are unmistakably the places I grew up in. Brockhurst, which I can only imagine is Gravenhurst where I lived across from the old Nazi prisoner of war camps, which were just concrete foundations by the time I live [...]

    6. I always rave and rave about this author but I do it for good reason- the woman understands the emotions of children.In this case it was Norah, the english "war guest" staying with a rich lady in toronto while war rages in her homeland. This book in the trilogy was set in Norah's favourite island of Gairloch in the Muskoka cottage country. There she can be herself, there she can fall in love.Although only 13, she's convinced she loves Andrew, the nephew of her "aunt" florence. The story is a ver [...]

    7. A re-read from childhood. I probably haven't touched this one since I was actually thirteen, because Norah's experiences of puberty were way too acute and raw for me for a long time (also, my brother is named Andrew and it was too weird for me as a kid to read about Norah having a crush on a guy with the same name.) Pearson, once again, nails what it is to be a moody, broody girl going through puberty, but what I found just as interesting on my grownup reread was some of the background character [...]

    8. Set in 1943, 13 ear old Norah and her 8 year old brother Gavin were sent to Canada from England 3 years prior as war guests to their wealthy cousins. it is summer time and everyone is spending the month of August at the cottage in Musoka where Norah meets her 19 year old cousin Andrew and immediately develops a strong crush for him. She starts fantasizing about life when they are older and married. Andrew confides in Norah about his distaste for the war and the fact that he doesn't want to in li [...]

    9. gr 6-8 212pgsSummer 1943 Gairloch Canada. 13 year old Norah and her 8 year old brother Gavin are still living as war guests with the Ogilvie family. Every summer, the Ogilivie clan gathers at the family summer home "Gairloch". Norah still misses her parents and England, but this summer her thoughts are filled by Andrew, her 19 year old "cousin", who has come to spend the summer at the cabin along with the rest of the family. I would recommend this book to someone interested in coming of age stor [...]

    10. gr 6-8 212pgsSummer 1943 Gairloch Canada. 13 year old Norah and her 8 year old brother Gavin are still living as war guests with the Ogilvie family. Every summer, the Ogilivie clan gathers at the family summer home "Gairloch". Norah still misses her parents and England, but this summer her thoughts are filled by Andrew, her 19 year old "cousin", who has come to spend the summer at the cabin along with the rest of the family. I would recommend this book to someone interested in coming of age stor [...]

    11. I find we threw too much girly-angst into this one, and I am tempted to say ruined my feelings on the series, but I will tell you that if you're not into pointless and ridiculous swooning, just skip this book. Not much happened here anyway. And in 'The lights go on again' we reviewed all the important stuff.It might've been better if Pearson made this one about Goosey and Loosey (that's their nicknames right?) instead of stretching Norah and her girly feels.Although they probably would be swooni [...]

    12. Looking at the moon followed Norah and Gavins summer at the Gailoche- the mansion cottage owned by the Oglivies. Being Norah's 2nd time at the cottage, she cant wait to swim in the lake, read, and enjoy the peaceful time away from the big city. But soon she is introduced to Andrew, a 19-year old boy and is annoyed at how everyone thinks of him as the "hero" of the family. But she soon realizes that he she likes him. She wants to be around him as much as possible. But she is surprised when he tel [...]

    13. While not as striking as The Sky Is Falling, the second installment of the Guests of War trilogy is still wonderfully written and relatable. I mean #jokes I'm basically still thirteen-year-old Norah, hopelessly in love with someone who's entirely out of her league, making up ridiculous fantasies that will never come true, and having the tenacity to believe those fantasies might come true. This book really emphasizes how truly horrible unrequited feelings are, and is set in the beautiful Muskokas [...]

    14. Three years have passed since Norah and Gavin evacuated to Toronto. During summer vacation, the Ogilvie’s take Norah and Gavin on a train trip to Vancouver to meet some Ogilvie relatives. Then, to Norah and Gavin’s delight, they spend August at Gairloch, the Drummond family’s lakeside retreat. (Aunt Florence’s maiden name is Drummond.) For Norah, one heavenly month at Gairloch means fresh air, moonlight walks, canoe rides, fishing, and sleeping in the girl cousin dormitory. Norah loves t [...]

    15. This is the one in the series I never read as a kid and I loved it! I do love books that are set on lakeside cabins and I love that they included a little age-appropriate romance in the book! I can really vividly imagine life up at the cottage and how nice it was. I like that this book doesn't deal as much directly with the war, but more Norah and Gavin growing up and maturing in that setting with the war as a background.

    16. To be honest with you guys I wanted to give this 4 stars. But at the same time I feel like the ending was kind of rushed. That was what bothered me so much. But the book itself while I was reading it throughout was AMAZING, I could never put it down. But my heart also really wanted Norah and the guy to end up together

    17. Oh god, this book. Suddenly I can remember being a grade four girl again. This series had such a huge impact on me as a child, and it had been more than a decade since the last time I re-read. Specifically Looking At The Moon was such a defining book of that awkward child into adolescent phase, and I am so thrilled it didn't disappoint 27 year old me, either.

    18. This book was disappointing after the first. Other than the backdrop of being "war guests", this story is mostly about a 13-year-old girl's crush on a 19-year-old boy and the inevitable resolution to that situation. While it is probably enjoyable to a teenage girl, it doesn't hold a whole lot of interest for adults.

    19. The second in the WWII "war guests" trilogy. When Norah arrived in Canada, she was only 10. But now she's 13 and is fairly well-adjusted to her new life. She spends the summer at the lake with her extended "family" and falls in love with her older "cousin." Pearson handles the adolescent angst stuff beautifully and leaves me eager for the final installment.

    20. While not quite as good as the Sky is Falling, this one perfectly covers the coming of age, your first taste of "love", and the scares of growing up. It is just as beautifully written as the Sky is Falling and of course, just as easily relate-able.

    21. I'm currently reading Looking at The Moon by Kit Pearson. It's about a girl named Norah and her brother Gavin's new lives in Canada during the war. It's a really good book. I have all 3. This one is the 2nd. In the 3rd they move back to England. You should read them.

    22. The continuing story of Norah and her brother, Gavin, growing up in Canada during WWII and anxiously awaiting news of those they love in England.

    23. this one was not as good as the first or lasto off-topic of the war. and too LOVEY DOVEY. i was still pulled into it though!

    24. Love this series!! This book was just as great as it was years ago when I read it!! Love it as much as the first.

    25. A really good read. I'm sorry to let this one go. I feel all melancholy. The shutting up of the cottage at the end of summer almost made me cry.

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