Open Cockpit

Open Cockpit Thanks to a broken leg during flight school Arthur Stanley Gould Lee gained valuable additional time flying trainers before he was posted to France during World War I In November during low leve

  • Title: Open Cockpit
  • Author: Arthur Stanley Gould Lee
  • ISBN: 9781908117250
  • Page: 465
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Thanks to a broken leg during flight school, Arthur Stanley Gould Lee gained valuable additional time flying trainers before he was posted to France during World War I In November 1917 during low level bombing and strafing attacks, he was shot down three times by ground fire He spent eight months at the front and accumulated 222 hours of flight time in Sopwith Pups and CThanks to a broken leg during flight school, Arthur Stanley Gould Lee gained valuable additional time flying trainers before he was posted to France during World War I In November 1917 during low level bombing and strafing attacks, he was shot down three times by ground fire He spent eight months at the front and accumulated 222 hours of flight time in Sopwith Pups and Camels during a staggering 118 patrols being engaged in combat 56 times He lived to retire from the RAF as an Air Vice Marshal in 1946 Author of three books, this is by far his best Lee puts you in the cockpit in a riveting account of life as a fighter pilot at the front At turns humorous and dramatic, this thoughtful, enlightening, true account is a classic to be ranked with Winged Victory by W V Yeates, also published by Grub Street.

    One thought on “Open Cockpit”

    1. Of all the First World War pilot memoirs I’ve read over the years, this is one of the best. Arthur Stanley Gould Lee relates how he managed to wrangle a transfer in 1916 from his army unit to the Royal Flying Corps, where he soon discovered that flight training was haphazard and often dangerous. Most of the instructors under whom he trained (many of whom had seen active service in France) were unskilled in imparting the skills of flying to their pupils. Oftentimes, the expectation was for the [...]

    2. Authentic and SincereThis is a great book for recreating life in the air in WWI. The author speaks with well earned authority about the trials and tribulations of warfare with simple directness.

    3. The dedication in "No Parachute" reads "To my first wife Gwyneth Ann, who died long ago and to whom the letters in this book were sent in the springtime of my life." Arthur Gould Lee's wife had to have been as tough as nails to endure her husband's daily graphic descriptions of death and carnage. It is as if Lee's senses are hyper electrified, recording everything he sees, feels, hears, smells in a simple, visceral, razor sharp manner. Yet at the same time his letters have an almost preconceived [...]

    4. Good story. A historic account of a WW1 pilot. Not as dark of an opinion as Tales of a Lost Pilot, but the challenges these guys faced in flying aircraft that was as much a danger to them as the enemy comes through.

    5. A first person account of what being a WW1, British, fighter pilot was like. Like Biggles, but with less dashing and more fear. Very enjoyable read.

    6. In 1914 no one knew anything about flying and Lee had luck and talent to make it through.Combat was not the only danger and Lee's good fortune was to be assigned to an airplane that was fairly competitive and by God's grace, not struck by Friendly Fire. Lee goes on to command positions in WWII and in this and his book No Parachute, tells the tales without worrying about hurting the feelings of the officials origination technology and policy in the unknown field of aviation.

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