Season of '42: Joe D., Teddy Ballgame, and Baseball's Fight to Survive a Turbulent First Year of War

Season of Joe D Teddy Ballgame and Baseball s Fight to Survive a Turbulent First Year of War Big league baseball would seem to have been a hard sell in World War II was not going well for the United States in the Pacific and not much better in Europe Moreover the country was in drastica

  • Title: Season of '42: Joe D., Teddy Ballgame, and Baseball's Fight to Survive a Turbulent First Year of War
  • Author: Jack Cavanaugh
  • ISBN: 9781616087401
  • Page: 157
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Big league baseball would seem to have been a hard sell in 1942 World War II was not going well for the United States in the Pacific and not much better in Europe Moreover, the country was in drastically short supply of ships, planes, submarines, torpedoes, and other war materials, and Uncle Sam needed men, millions of them, including those from twenty one through thirtyBig league baseball would seem to have been a hard sell in 1942 World War II was not going well for the United States in the Pacific and not much better in Europe Moreover, the country was in drastically short supply of ships, planes, submarines, torpedoes, and other war materials, and Uncle Sam needed men, millions of them, including those from twenty one through thirty five years of age who had been ordered to register for the draft, the age range of most big league baseball players.But after a green light from President Roosevelt, major league baseball played on in 1942 as it would throughout the war It turned out to be an extraordinary season, too, spiced by a brash, young, and swift St Louis Cardinal team that stunned the baseball world by winning the World Series The 1942 season would be overshadowed by war, though, with many people wondering whether it was really all right for four hundred seemingly healthy and athletic men to play a child s game and earn far money than the thousands of young Americans whose lives were at risk as they fought the Germans and Japanese abroad In Season of 42, veteran sportswriter Jack Cavanaugh takes a look at this historic baseball season, how it was shaped and affected by the war and what, ultimately, it meant to America.

    One thought on “Season of '42: Joe D., Teddy Ballgame, and Baseball's Fight to Survive a Turbulent First Year of War”

    1. I was disappointed. I do not discount the hard work that went into such a huge undertaking that the sub-title of the book promised: "Jo D, Teddy Ballgame, and baseball's Fight to Survive a Turbulent First Year of War." However, the editing was very poorly done, as I identified at least five glaring errors in fact; and countless typos that were never corrected. This kind of poor editing put doubt in my mind as a reader regarding the veracity of any other fact. The story did not really have a cohe [...]

    2. In 1942 the war was not going well for the United States. There was a great need for ships, planes, submarines etc and manpower. Especially strong young men between the ages of 21 and 35. It therefore might have seemed frivolous for men to be playing a “kid’s game”, at this time. President Roosevelt however gave major league baseball a ‘green light’, many draft boards went along with it, the ball players that were drafted were usually assigned as physical fitness trainers or actually p [...]

    3. It's quite a feat to take a fascinating topic (the first year of the war, intermingled with its impact on baseball) and tell the story in a flat, boring way. This author manages to pull it off.Lesson here is you need some genuine passion for a topic that comes through OR some pervasive theme of your book OR something to make the book pull you in and really CARE about the topic. This is a great illustration of an author that doesn't do any of this.All that aside, the one thing I did learn was tha [...]

    4. Despite the books' errors, of which there are a few, the author sheds light on a very interesting aspect of American Baseball's history in light of World War II.There are a lot of traditions and slogans that originated in baseball having to do with the war at the time, which I was surprised to find out. Every chapter was a new insight to why there are so many deep roots within baseball, and why fans of such teams as the Yankees and the Cardinals have such a deep connection. I know I'll look at B [...]

    5. If the reader forgives about a million typos and it being factually inaccurate, this would still be a mediocre book.But, owing to the millions of typos and factual inaccuracies in what was supposed to have been a well researched and well edited, non-fiction title, this book is planted firmly in the terrible column.The best part of this book is the soft and absorbent paper it's printed on.

    6. Had this book on my wish list. Very disappointed. A lot of history/biography of players that had little to do with what actually happened in 1942.Would have been interesting, I suppose, to someone less well read in baseball, but there was nothing new here.

    7. A good idea in theory, but practice a tepid history of both baseball and the war. In seeking to cover both topics, Cavanaugh succeeds at neither.

    8. Excellent. A blend of my two favorite subjects-- baseball and World War II. However, I did note some typos, which didn't thrill me.

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