How to Grow Perennial Vegetables: Low-maintenance, Low-impact Vegetable Gardening

How to Grow Perennial Vegetables Low maintenance Low impact Vegetable Gardening Perennial vegetables are a joy to grow and require a lot less time and effort than annuals In this book Martin Crawford gives comprehensive advice on all types of perennial vegetables edible plants th

  • Title: How to Grow Perennial Vegetables: Low-maintenance, Low-impact Vegetable Gardening
  • Author: Martin Crawford Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall
  • ISBN: 9781900322843
  • Page: 349
  • Format: Paperback
  • Perennial vegetables are a joy to grow and require a lot less time and effort than annuals In this book Martin Crawford gives comprehensive advice on all types of perennial vegetables edible plants that live longer than three years including coppiced trees, aquatic plants and edible woodland species There are many advantages to growing perennial vegetables, for examplePerennial vegetables are a joy to grow and require a lot less time and effort than annuals In this book Martin Crawford gives comprehensive advice on all types of perennial vegetables edible plants that live longer than three years including coppiced trees, aquatic plants and edible woodland species There are many advantages to growing perennial vegetables, for example they need less tillage than conventionally grown vegetables, so the soil structure is not distrubed in their cultivation and carbon is retailed int he soil They extend the harvesting season, especially in early spring they are often of value to beneficial insects than are annual vegetables many perennial vegetables contain higher levles of mineral nutrients than annuals.

    One thought on “How to Grow Perennial Vegetables: Low-maintenance, Low-impact Vegetable Gardening”

    1. Good: nicely organized and attractively laid-out. A large selection of plants represented, both common and uncommon varieties. Good information on culinary uses of the plants.Bad: Seemed oriented more towards the UK than US (obviously fine if you live in the UK). Info on cultivation was a little more inconsistent and sometimes incomplete.Overall this works great as a source of inspiration for new plants to grow, but I'd probably turn to another reference to confirm the growing conditions and day [...]

    2. Very interesting and insightful for a variety of perennial vegetables and it maintenance. Hard to personally connect with as I live in the US and the book focuses on the UK.

    3. I was gung-ho to read this after reading a few initial reviews (not on GR) from other permaculturists. Then I read a few more reviews and was feeling wary. (The reviews ranged from banally unenthusiastic to correctly concerned about serious errors in another of his books -- serious like incorrect labeling of pictures. When it comes to edibles, it's important to get that right. I'm not sure if this book is by the same publisher.)I already had it set on hold when my expectations wilted, and when i [...]

    4. Again, like many of Martin Crawford's publications, there is a lot of recycled information. The most overall and general purpose publication is definitely Creating A Forest Garden. Thus, this one is really not a must-read, although it is immensely enjoyable, inspiring and a good reference tool. The list of species is larger too, so if you are still not satisfied and curious for more after CAFG, then this is a good place to go. There is a bit more theory, advice of plating patterns, using the roo [...]

    5. I preferred Perennial Vegetables: From Artichokes to Zuiki Taro, a Gardener's Guide to Over 100 Delicious and Easy to Grow Edibles

    6. I read the beginning and only skimmed the majority of the book, the A-Z list. It seems helpful, but not encyclopedic.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *