The Red Diary/The Re[a]d Diary

The Red Diary The Re a d Diary A BOLD EXPERIMENT IN THE GRAPHIC NOVEL Kristiansen s European Album is newly translated to English by the Eisner nominated winning team behind the acclaimed Vertigo graphic novel It s a Bird Teddy K

  • Title: The Red Diary/The Re[a]d Diary
  • Author: Teddy Kristiansen Steven T. Seagle
  • ISBN: 9781607065609
  • Page: 426
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A BOLD EXPERIMENT IN THE GRAPHIC NOVEL Kristiansen s European Album is newly translated to English by the Eisner nominated winning team behind the acclaimed Vertigo graphic novel, It s a Bird, Teddy Kristiansen and Steven T Seagle, but in a unique flip novel format that also re mixes with a completely different script devised by Seagle before he collaborated on the traA BOLD EXPERIMENT IN THE GRAPHIC NOVEL Kristiansen s European Album is newly translated to English by the Eisner nominated winning team behind the acclaimed Vertigo graphic novel, It s a Bird, Teddy Kristiansen and Steven T Seagle, but in a unique flip novel format that also re mixes with a completely different script devised by Seagle before he collaborated on the translation Both versions The Red Diary, a tale of art forgery and World War, and The Re a d Diary, a tale of identity theft and lost love comprise this unique graphic novel.

    One thought on “The Red Diary/The Re[a]d Diary”

    1. This weekend Richard Linklater’s Before Midnight lands in metropolitan theaters across America [review originally published in May 2013]. It’s a film that I am hotly anticipating and one I’m hotly anticipating landing in less metropolitan regions of the country. Before Midnight is the third in what may be my all-time favourite film series and follows Before Sunrise and its sequel, Before Sunset. And while I currently feel my blood vibrate in anticipation for a new sequel to Before Sunrise, [...]

    2. It's a neat idea. Two stories using the same illustrations - changing only the words. It's like an exercise in making sure the text of a graphic novel is just as important as the pictures. The stories have similar themes and subject matter, but are quite different. It's a fascinating concept.So I'm glad I read it. For the experimental-ness. The illustrations are beautiful, but ultimately not specific enough to grab me. They're impressionistic, shadowy, undetailed. And I didn't find them particul [...]

    3. Absolutely fantastic. I much prefer the original story, but they are both fantastic. The art captures the mood and darkness of WWI perfectly. A must read for anyone who loves graphic novels.

    4. En este comic se evocan reflexiones, recuerdos, sentimientos y búsquedas interiores, no lo conocía me llamo la atención y lo cogí por pura casualidad, me gusta descubrir nuevas cosas.

    5. Beautiful art, ink and watercolor, and pretty interesting, interwoven stories from WWI. . . with some reflections on diaries and art and biography in the process. And that's just one story, Red Diary, written and drawn by Teddy Kristiansen. Once you get to the middle of the book, you work from the back to read R(e)ad Diary, which is written by Stephen Seagle based on a silly idea he came up with back in college: If you can't read something in translation, use English words that look like the wor [...]

    6. I read this without knowing anything about it other than I liked the cover art. I read the first and what turned out to be the original story translated from French and thought, good. Great art, fantastic painting-quality art and a somewhat muddled story about a biographer looking for information on an unknown artist who died in WWI. Then I got to the middle, where the first story ended and had to flip it over to read the other story, told with the same art by a different writer who had no knowl [...]

    7. I read this without knowing anything about it other than I liked the cover art. I read the first and what turned out to be the original story translated from French and thought, good. Great art, fantastic painting-quality art and a somewhat muddled story about a biographer looking for information on an unknown artist who died in WWI. Then I got to the middle, where the first story ended and had to flip it over to read the other story, told with the same art by a different writer who had no knowl [...]

    8. OK, it's an interesting enough experiment, but as a reader I felt cheated by the whole 'transliteration' thing. There was so much potential for, and indeed an expectation of, truly intricate and interwoven tales, even if both used the same graphics. (But that too left me feeling shortchanged, as we weren't treated to 60 new pages of the fantastic art.) Instead, in Re[a]d, we just get an echo that doesn't hold nearly the emotional resonance of the original. Four stars for "Red", two stars for Re[ [...]

    9. a very interesting experiment in what Seagle calls "transliteration". And the art itself is somewhere between Munch and Kirchner - it's a treat.

    10. The idea for this book is fascinating. Two separate stories using the same images. First the original story translated into English in the normal way, then a different story "transliterated" from Danish into English by someone who doesn't speak Danish. He basically makes guesses about what the words might mean based on how they look. That is a neat concept that seems like it could have been devised by the "Oulipo" group. Unlike much of the works from that group, the result is easily readable and [...]

    11. This book is interesting because of the concept behind it and the art work but unfortunately neither story is particularly special.

    12. 3.5 stars.I read The Red Diary first, and then The Re[a]d Diary, which meant that I did not come to Steven Seagle's explanation of the stories' juxtaposition until after I had finished both versions. I was reading the second one (Seagle's "translation") under the impression that it was a retelling of the original story in some way related to the content, not just the art, and I spent much of the second story confused. I flipped the book over several times to go back to the first story, trying to [...]

    13. Two stories with the same set of artwork.Teddy Kristiansen originally wrote and illustrated "Le Carnet Rouge." Steven Seagle wanted to bring the work to his publishing house and release it in English, but they needed him to get a writing or illustrating credit. He might have been able to get away with a translation; problem was, Seagle didn't speak French or Danish (the extant translation).So instead, he did something funny. He took the Danish translation and "matched" English words to it based [...]

    14. Turns out this is two versions of one man's graphic novel, the one he wrote and illustrated himself and the other a 'transliteration' of what another man interpreted for the translation to the word associations of the text and using the same graphics. This information was sandwiched into the middle of the two. I liked them both with their exploration of war and identity though not a favorite genre for me.This could be a great idea for getting students into engaging with literature written in oth [...]

    15. I'm sad about the decision to put a heavy black border around the delicate and elegant drawings and the speech/narration balloons do not fit at all. It takes away from the organic feel of the drawings and the story even. It's a shame. I liked the book (I only read The Red Diary. The Steven Seagle version wasn't in this copy). It the mystery of it all kept me wanting to read on which was an awesome feeling. I would love to see a more organic layout of this story. I think it would take it up a not [...]

    16. I've only read a hand-full of graphic novels. I'm learning to appreciate them as a genre. This book was an interesting read. It wasn't super dynamic, but it kept my attention. I did have a little trouble following the story(-ies). Without spoiling the book for anyone, this is a "flip" book containing more than one story. The concept of how it was put together was really an interesting one. A pretty cool idea.

    17. This one was really cool. I started with the Re[a]d Diary side, and I'm glad I did, but I don't really know if that's the side I was supposed to read first. I don't think it matters which order you choose. I do recommend reading the notes at the end of Re[a]d Diary at some point, unless you already know the deal with this book, which I didn't. I don't think I would have enjoyed it so much without knowing the idea behind splitting it the way they did. Good stuff.

    18. I didn't realize it when I picked this up, but it's two separate stories. When you flip the book vertically the back cover isn't the back cover, it's the front cover again for a slightly different tale.The art is identical in each story, but the plot and characters differ; both versions are written by two different authors.Neither story really did anything for me personally, but I still admired the deviation from the norm and the spirit of sharing between the writers.

    19. Fascinating book. One side is a translation of a graphic novel by Teddy Kristiansen about a writer researching the life of a forgotten WWII era artist. The other side of this flip-book is the story Steven Seagle wrote to go with Kristiansen's art before he read the translation of the text. Both stories are very good and deal, in one way or another, with issues of identity.

    20. Interesting idea. Through chance, I wound up reading the "remix" story first. It's interesting to see the similarities between the two stories. In the end, I think the idea behind the book is at least slightly more interesting than either of the two stories.

    21. Beautifully illustrated in watercolors designed to tell one story that are reinterpreted for another -- fantastic book!

    22. Interesting concept, but the story confused me (and not in the way that I think the authors intended), and the dialogue felt stilted (which is probably partly a problem of translation).

    23. Both stories are beautiful and haunting. Kristiansen's piece was much more dry, while Seagle's was more entertaining. Maybe that is just a difference in European and American writing.

    24. Amazing how drawings can be interpreted. This flip graphic novel features that same art work but completely different stories - both of which I thoroughly enjoyed.

    25. Eh. This was just okay. I immensely enjoyed the conceptual idea (transliteration), but didn't find either of the stories depicted especially interesting. Ah well.

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