The Joe Kubert Archives, Vol. 1: Weird Horrors and Daring Adventures

The Joe Kubert Archives Vol Weird Horrors and Daring Adventures Joe Kubert sealed his reputation as one of the greatest American comic book cartoonists of all time with the four color adventures of Sgt Rock of Easy Company Enemy Ace and Tarzan all done for DC C

  • Title: The Joe Kubert Archives, Vol. 1: Weird Horrors and Daring Adventures
  • Author: Joe Kubert Bill Schelly
  • ISBN: 9781606995815
  • Page: 397
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Joe Kubert sealed his reputation as one of the greatest American comic book cartoonists of all time with the four color adventures of Sgt Rock of Easy Company, Enemy Ace, and Tarzan, all done for DC Comics during the 1960s and 1970s themselves already the subject of archival editions but he had been working in comics since the 1940s In fact, young Kubert produced anJoe Kubert sealed his reputation as one of the greatest American comic book cartoonists of all time with the four color adventures of Sgt Rock of Easy Company, Enemy Ace, and Tarzan, all done for DC Comics during the 1960s and 1970s themselves already the subject of archival editions but he had been working in comics since the 1940s In fact, young Kubert produced an exciting, significant body of work as a freelance artist for a variety of comic book publishers in the postwar era, in a glorious variety of non super hero genres horror, crime, science fiction, western, romance, humor, and For the first time, 33 of the best of these stories have been collected in one full color volume, with a special emphasis on horror and crime The Kubert work in this book is that of a burgeoning talent attacking the work with tremendous panache, and in the process, developing a style that became one of the most distinctive in the medium Since these stories were written and drawn in the pre Comics Code era, they are thrilling, violent and sexy by contemporary standards than much of his later, Code constrained work And just the titles of the comic books from which these stories are taken are wonderfully evocative of a bygone era of four color fun Cowpuncher, Abbott and Costello Comics, Three Stooges, Eerie, Planet Comics, Meet Miss Pepper, Strange Terrors, Green Hornet Comics, Whack, Jesse James, Out of This World, Crime Does Not Pay, Weird Thrillers, Police Lineup, and Hollywood Confessions As with Fantagraphics 8217 acclaimed Steve Ditko and Bill Everett Archives series, Weird Horrors and Daring Adventures boasts state of the art restoration and retouching, and historical notes by the book 8217 s editor Bill Schelly, author of the Art of Joe Kubert art book and Man of Rock Kubert biography.

    One thought on “The Joe Kubert Archives, Vol. 1: Weird Horrors and Daring Adventures”

    1. This is a very interesting book but I'm not sure I'm really up to reviewing it. I mean, I've read some old comics, but I'm not all that educated on the issue, so there's whole swatches of interesting observations that I cannot make. For instance, "You can really see the influence of Milton Caniff of Terry and the Pirates." That's the kind of observation that I have to read about elsewhere, like here or here. There's a little intro and a little afterword, but they only give a little context.Which [...]

    2. A fine collection of Joe Kubert's miscellaneous pulp comics. There are gun-toting dames, star pirates and, of course, weird horrors. While the scripts range from bad to slightly less bad, the art is the main showcase here. Joe Kubert's golden age era art is tip-top and worth checking out. While I rather enjoyed the swashbuckler stories, and anything originally published in Eerie is gold, Joe Kubert's best work is probably Sgt. Rock and Tarzan or his later graphic novels. But this is a decent loo [...]

    3. I'm possibly overrating this. Kubert is one of those legendary comics artists, highly influential, enviable track record, all that, but, honestly, the writing on some of these stories is pretty dreadful. Not all of them are bad, but enough are to make this book pretty tough going in spots. It's nice to see early work from such a huge talent, but some of the stories are all too typical of what was being produced during the '40s and '50s. Good stuff, but not for everyone. There are certainly bette [...]

    4. This is a great collection of early Kubert work. It is eclectic in the extreme with samples from pretty much any comic genre that can be imagined. Of the whole collection the war-time comics stand out as really outrageous and the pre-code horror offerings shined. I do wish that the whole Attack from Mars story had been printed; issues 2 & 3, which did not have Kubert art, could have been an appendix.

    5. Misleading title, for sure. There's only a few weird tales in here, as well as a few daring stories. This is a collection of Kubert's earliest work, and is a hodgepodge of writing he worked on. I still found it an easy and fun read, but not what I had anticipated.

    6. About as good as you could expect from one of the best artists of the 50s and 60s. Some of the stories are a bit dull, but all range from just readable to excellent. Kubert, to me, is at his best when he steers toward a very stylized look, yet keeps his lines simple.

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