The End of Order

The End of Order The first world was and the Versailles Treaty that followed produced the most serious upheaval in the long and stormy course of modern history Four great empires Germany Austria Hungary Turkey and

  • Title: The End of Order
  • Author: Charles L. Mee
  • ISBN: 9780525098102
  • Page: 396
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The first world was and the Versailles Treaty that followed produced the most serious upheaval in the long and stormy course of modern history Four great empires Germany, Austria Hungary, Turkey, and Russia were part of the war s rubble Far from restoring the world to order, the diplomats who met in 1919 at Paris and at Versailles plunged the world again, this time iThe first world was and the Versailles Treaty that followed produced the most serious upheaval in the long and stormy course of modern history Four great empires Germany, Austria Hungary, Turkey, and Russia were part of the war s rubble Far from restoring the world to order, the diplomats who met in 1919 at Paris and at Versailles plunged the world again, this time irretrievably, into the chaos of the twentieth century It was the end of order.

    One thought on “The End of Order”

    1. The format of the book is a series of short (1 to 2 page) vignettes from the Paris peace conference. Many are quite funny - or would be, if the consequences for the following years were not so grave. Don't miss Keynes parody of minutes from a meeting of the Big 3.

    2. The Catch-22 of Versailles. Everyone knew that the treaty was bad yet they signed it anyways. They felt that politics required them to. It makes absolutely no sense yet when you look back at it that's exactly what appears to have happened. If others had been the negotiators of the treaty everything might have turned out very differently, then again, it might have turned out exactly the same. One thing we can be sure of is that with Wilson, Clemenceau and George as the primary negotiators, things [...]

    3. Not really a book about the diplomatic, political and social challenges of the end of WWI, but a book trying to go through the motions of the times (including some useless paragraphs on dadaism) and the battles between the 3 main leaders (Clémenceau, Lloyd George and Wilson), who chose to write most of the treaty by themselves, without consulting anyone or pondering about what it may all lead to. One cannot help but think that most French leaders should also have been tried at Nuremberg for bei [...]

    4. This book is not as ambitious as Margaret Macmillan's "Peacemakers" as its focus is primarily on the the treaty with Germany with some discussion of the issues concerning Austria, Hungary and Italy. To his credit the author does give us considerably more insight than Margaret Macmillan's book as to what was happening in Germany during the six months that Britain, France and the US were negotiating among themselves the terms of the treaty. And he presents the German perspectives (sic) as how to n [...]

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