Jesus of Nazareth: What He Wanted, Who He Was

Jesus of Nazareth What He Wanted Who He Was Who was Jesus A prophet There have been many of those A miracle worker A radical revolutionary A wise teacher There have been many of these too In his latest book renowned Scripture scholar Gerhard

  • Title: Jesus of Nazareth: What He Wanted, Who He Was
  • Author: Gerhard Lohfink Linda M. Maloney
  • ISBN: 9780814680582
  • Page: 233
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Who was Jesus A prophet There have been many of those A miracle worker A radical revolutionary A wise teacher There have been many of these, too In his latest book, renowned Scripture scholar Gerhard Lohfink asks, What is unique about Jesus of Nazareth, and what did he really want Lohfink engages the perceptions of the first witnesses of his life and ministry and thWho was Jesus A prophet There have been many of those A miracle worker A radical revolutionary A wise teacher There have been many of these, too In his latest book, renowned Scripture scholar Gerhard Lohfink asks, What is unique about Jesus of Nazareth, and what did he really want Lohfink engages the perceptions of the first witnesses of his life and ministry and those who handed on their testimony His approach is altogether historical and critical, but he agrees with Karl Barth s statement that historical criticism has to be critical Lohfink takes seriously the fact that Jesus was a Jew and lived entirely in and out of Israel s faith experiences but at the same time brought those experiences to their goal and fulfillment The result is a convincing and profound picture of Jesus.

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    1. Review of Jesus of Nazareth: What He Wanted, Who He WasBy Gerhard Lohfink(Greg Cusack, Reviewer) Ms. Linda Maloney has given us an excellent translation of this important work by the German Catholic theologian, Dr. Gerhard Lohfink. Accordingly, the text – while often beautiful but always theological in tone – is quite accessible for even conversant laypeople. I think persons seriously interested in knowing more about Jesus and his times would benefit from this very readable, and often incred [...]

    2. This is going to be my long, "serious," Lenten book. (And I predict I'll still be reading it during the Easter season too.)Original reflections on it are below.========I found this because it was continually referenced in James Martin's Jesus: A Pilgrimage which I just reread for a book club discussion.This book is freaking amazing.By the time I'd gotten to the second chapter I knew I'd need my own copy so I could mark it up.It is dense in the way that Pope Benedict or Romano Guardini can be. Ho [...]

    3. The only negative thing I can say, not about the book, but about the author, is that Gerhard Lohfink was one of the 7 professors at Tübingen University who, in February 1980, voted to oust their fellow theologian, Hans Küng, from the faculty after a long & brilliant career. I consider that action shameful.Nevertheless, Lohfink is a fine biblical & Christological theologian: and that's an assessment not from me, but from Hans Küng, even in face of Lohfink's betrayal. This is one of the [...]

    4. This is an exceptional work, difficult too recommend to highly. Lohfink's major contribution is to overcome the false dichotomy between the Jesus of History and the Christ of faith by a careful use of historical-critical study that is rooted in the faith of the Church and not a personal agenda. Along the way, he consistently provides shining insights on a whole collection of New Testament issues such as the relationship between the Kingdom and the Church, the relationship between miracles and mo [...]

    5. A fascinating work on Jesus with a strong emphasis on the Reign of God. It combines Christology, eschatology, ecclesiology, and some fascinating interpretations of scripture. In some ways it might be considered "conservative" doctrinally because of its positions on Jesus' resurrection and on the Church. But it goes beyond those types of labels in its encounter with Jesus and the Church.

    6. I found this book from some reviews as one of the best biographies of Jesus. I am no theologian or scholar, but I felt like Lohfink really gave me access to a new appreciation of Jesus in the world of 2000 years ago, and how interpretations in more recent centuries have limited us.

    7. What a book to start the new year with!This isn't one you can breeze through. There were moments I had to sit back to take notes, and to consult the Bible to piece it all together. But it's brilliantly presented. In church, we learn of Jesus simply as Messiah—which he is first and foremost—but this study digs into his humanity. I was consistently caught off-guard about the concept of Jesus studying, and didn't quite believe it at first. Why would the Son of God have to study Torah? But he wa [...]

    8. This is an excellent book, but the scholarship is not as recent as others, which is the reason for 3/5 stars. St. Jerome gives us the famous dictum "Ignorance of the Scriptures is ignorance of Christ." This is as true now as when St. Jerome translated the Bible from Greek (LXX for the Jewish Scriptures) into Latin. However, we live in the 21st century and we have a post-modern, post-Enlightenment outlook on reality. This is not a bad thing but radically alters how we approach the Scriptures and [...]

    9. Lots and lots of information. Some very interesting. A bit dry for my taste, but again, some very interesting things about Jesus, nonetheless!

    10. I cannot claim to have read a ton of Jesus-books, but this is definetely a book that does what I would want a Jesus-book to do. Solid engagement with the results of historical research combined with theological, philosophical and political sophistication, that produces a picture of Jesus that is theologically relevant. Lohfinks emphases’ are not original: the jewishness of Jesus and the early church, the centrality of the reign of God to Jesus preaching, and the necassity of a commitment to th [...]

    11. Author carries a theme of gathering people from the Hebrew Scriptures through the New Testament. He anchors his Christology in Jewish thought rather than in Hellenistic philosophy. As such, it is very liberating. Chapter 19 is particularly interesting as he examines the description of the kingdom coming as a thief in the night linguistically. He shows the tense of the saying as the past that did not happen. If only the owner had known the thief was coming (he didn't) he would have prevented the [...]

    12. I love good books on Jesus. This is one of those. Very good. Lohfink writes with a great deal of thoughtfulness and insight. There's a lot of gold here. Not that I agree with all that he has to say but that's okay. It's not a terribly long read (approx. 350 pages w/o footnotes) and it never bogs down. 'Jesus and Community' is another valuable book by the same author written 25 years earlier so he's been at it awhile.

    13. This is a masterful christology book. While it is a scholarly read, it is also quite accessible. Lofink looks at the usual aspects of Jesus' life, but with a new gloss in many cases. The author is faithful to the historical-critical method and affirms the significance of Jesus' Jewishness. Well done!

    14. Very good publication. Author of the book points many problems which many readers of Gospels can encounter. Especially for me the most valuable was chapters about miracles of Jesus and the Kingdom of God.

    15. Brilliant. Far and away one of the single best theological books I've encountered. Fr. Lohfink's Christology is exquisite.

    16. The most recent, complete, and insightful discussion of Jesus Christ yet written. Beautifully written, clear and understandable to lay people. The best Jesus book I have ever read!

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