Fain the Sorcerer

Fain the Sorcerer Looping through his own past and offending kings and leaders throughout the world Fain searches for the means to wisely direct his new powers His quest grows increasingly vivid as he encounters monst

  • Title: Fain the Sorcerer
  • Author: Steve Aylett
  • ISBN: 9781904619642
  • Page: 435
  • Format: None
  • Looping through his own past and offending kings and leaders throughout the world, Fain searches for the means to wisely direct his new powers His quest grows increasingly vivid as he encounters monsters, mermaids, warlocks and autarchs, gathering richer understanding with each magic gift With an introduction by Alan Moore, Fain the Sorcerer is a dense and mischievous woLooping through his own past and offending kings and leaders throughout the world, Fain searches for the means to wisely direct his new powers His quest grows increasingly vivid as he encounters monsters, mermaids, warlocks and autarchs, gathering richer understanding with each magic gift With an introduction by Alan Moore, Fain the Sorcerer is a dense and mischievous work of shamanic satire.

    One thought on “Fain the Sorcerer”

    1. If you haven't been exposed to the literary onslaught of Steve Aylett's genius, and if you're the kind of person who likes to get in at the shallow end of the pool first, Fain the Sorcerer is one of the better places to start. Expect the usual Aylett bits: brilliant sarcasm on every page, nuggets of prose that make you stare at their beauty in every paragraph, and a plot, theme, and moral that sneak up on you while you're staring at all of the shiny words. As an experiment, with one of the less- [...]

    2. Well, I just didn't get it. At all. I'm very new to Aylett, having only read The Crime Studio before reading this one -- I absolutely loved The Crime Studio, but I don't know . . . This one just didn't do it for me.Fain the Sorcerer begins the story as Fain the Gardener -- how he becomes a sorcerer (view spoiler)[ (and time traveller and murderer and dragon slayer and etc.)(hide spoiler)] is the bulk of the tale. What Fain is, mostly, is a too-clever-for-his-own-good kinda guy, and there is a lo [...]

    3. Endlessly inventive parody/pastiche of high fantasy a la Lord Dunsany or Jack Vance. One of Aylett’s most immediately rewarding text, if this was more easy and cheap to find it would be a great introduction to his work. Plus the Alan Moore intro is a great tribute/analysis of Aylett’s oeuvre. Oh and read Seth's super in depth review.

    4. Fantasy novella in the Jack Vance-Cugel mode, but done in the Aylett style you either think is uproariously funny or you don't get at all. If you are the former, or not sure (in which case I'll say Aylett's work is sort of the prose equivalent of "The Mighty Boosh"), I recommend you check it out.

    5. Too absurd Silly and descriptive but too much. The first third of the book kept my attention but thent so much. Perhaps I'm just not in the mood.

    6. Is part of the classic hero's journey a distillation of knowledge? If I don't know the answer to this question, does this make me not a hero (yet)? Fain the Sorcerer is a notch down in terms of pure inscrutable yet aphoristic weirdness from Aylett's The Complete Accomplice, and I loved it. I think it's what might be seen on a funhouse mirror that happens to be stuck in the corner of a classic hero's journey -- actually what reflects between two parallel funhouse mirrors.

    7. As usual Aylett busts genres and exceeds expectations. Here the fairy tale characters and rules are turned on their head by a character who has the ultimate contempt for rules. Despite the absolute absence of depth of character in the normal fairy tale story, Aylett slowly and constantly introduces pathos. Fain is a kind of Quixote or Groo. Aylett's chapters cover an enormous ground in few words, rich in humorous and irreverent near-hits and violations of clichés. This is clever like Vance, hum [...]

    8. This is weird and a little hard to follow. The three stars is mainly for the drag of the story. But not in a bad way. I read a lot of Aylett's work this one taking a step on a different genre for author. "Fain The Sorcerer" A time traveling fantasy. A journey to become ones self, I guess you can say. Read Recommended!

    9. A quick, though not quite easy read, as Aylett's prose will always make you sit up and take notice, giving plenty to ponder and laugh about. The story was even quite touching at points, resolving itself nicely. A good intro by Alan Moore on Steve Aylett's genius.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *