No One's World: The West, the Rising Rest, and the Coming Global Turn

No One s World The West the Rising Rest and the Coming Global Turn The world is on the cusp of a global turn Between and the West sprinted ahead of other centers of power in Asia and the Middle East Europe and the United States have dominated the world sin

  • Title: No One's World: The West, the Rising Rest, and the Coming Global Turn
  • Author: Charles A. Kupchan
  • ISBN: 9780199739394
  • Page: 342
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The world is on the cusp of a global turn Between 1500 and 1800, the West sprinted ahead of other centers of power in Asia and the Middle East Europe and the United States have dominated the world since But today the West s preeminence is slipping away as China, India, Brazil and other emerging powers rise Although most strategists recognize that the dominance of the WThe world is on the cusp of a global turn Between 1500 and 1800, the West sprinted ahead of other centers of power in Asia and the Middle East Europe and the United States have dominated the world since But today the West s preeminence is slipping away as China, India, Brazil and other emerging powers rise Although most strategists recognize that the dominance of the West is on the wane, they are confident that its founding ideas democracy, capitalism, and secular nationalism will continue to spread, ensuring that the Western order will outlast its primacy.In No One s World, Charles A Kupchan boldly challenges this view, arguing that the world is headed for political and ideological diversity emerging powers will neither defer to the West s lead nor converge toward the Western way The ascent of the West was the product of social and economic conditions unique to Europe and the United States As other regions now rise, they are following their own paths to modernity and embracing their own conceptions of domestic and international order.Kupchan contends that the Western order will not be displaced by a new great power or dominant political model The twenty first century will not belong to America, China, Asia, or anyone else It will be no one s world For the first time in history, the world will be interdependent but without a center of gravity or global guardian.More than simply diagnosing what lies ahead, Kupchan provides a detailed strategy for striking a bargain between the West and the rising rest by fashioning a new consensus on issues of legitimacy, sovereignty, and governance Thoughtful, provocative, sweeping in scope, this work is nothing less than a global guidebook for the 21st century.

    One thought on “No One's World: The West, the Rising Rest, and the Coming Global Turn”

    1. A great overview of how the West and the Rest got to where they are today and how to manage the future. The first half of the book wherein Kupchan walks the reader through the roots of Western primacy and the circumstances that held back the rest is the book's strongest point. As he advances into analysis of the current American predicament of dysfunctional politics an international overreach, however, he falls back on some of the cliches that plague contemporary commentary. "Serious thinkers" a [...]

    2. Having come in with fairly high expectations, I was disappointed by No One’s World. The book read as a loosely stitched together collection of tired op-eds (“Restoring Western Solvency,” “Managing No One’s World”) and cosmetic descriptions of the world as it exists today (African leaders are “The Strongmen,” while Latin America is governed by “The Populists”). At times, the work seemed more concerned with finding neat categories for the world’s governance structure (an iron [...]

    3. I found much of the book unconvincing. The historical sections were superficial and tended to assume that what happened in history was inevitable and depended on characteristics that he does not really explain. For instance, he claims that Europe developed scientifically while the Islamic world didn't because Islam is a law-based religion while Christianity is based on faith. But plenty of Christian sects have plenty of rules (and Catholicism for many years had rules scientists had to obey, just [...]

    4. Important but somewhat superficialKupchan's No One's World argues that the increasing prosperity of non-western countries will not lead to "China taking over the world", nor will it (in the near- or medium-term) lead to a convergence towards liberal democracy. Instead we are more likely to see a political and ideological diversity not seen since Europe embarked on its colonial project. There will be several competing versions of modernity, none of which will be able to completely dominate the ot [...]

    5. Kupchan’s No One’s World is an ideal read for historical neophytes. Kupchan chronicles the West, the East and all things in between for the last two hundred years. But, if you have read Zakaria’s The Post American World or Bernard Lewis’s What When Wrong, both of whom he sites in his book, you may find this redundant. However, unlike either of those books which provide a historical perspective with a nod to the contemporary landscape, neither offer a solution to the inevitable decline of [...]

    6. This book presents a strong argument that, not only is US hegemony unlikely to continue in the coming decades, but that we are not well-served by policies based on the belief that liberal democracy is the only legitimate form of government. After somewhat tediously opening with a review of the rise of liberal democracy in Europe and the US (needed to support his thesis that liberal democracy is not inevitable), Kupchan describes why he believes that the "communal, paternal, and tribal autocracie [...]

    7. Kupchan has written a book for popular audiences on the current challenges to U.S. foreign policy stemming from the growing influence of governments outside the traditional circle of Western great powers. It is an intellectually ambitious book in that the first three chapters attempt to synthesize a variety of ideas about the differences between the democratic industrialized nations of the West and the nations that arose in the wake of the breakup of the Ottoman empire. He enunciates an interest [...]

    8. This ultimately struck me an a "No Sh*t" book. It is a terrific history of how the west became dominant in forgien policy and offers some insights into what to expect from this point forward. But the books conclusion that we are headed to a multi polar world just seems obvious to me. The author also doesn't adaquately take on the American Firsters other than to say that we cannot maintain our dominance that we currently enjoy. While I agree, there are many that think we should do all we can to m [...]

    9. 'The good news is that Kupchan’s book is just the right size—around 200 pages—with not too many endnotes and a short but valuable bibliography. Kupchan is readable without being too glib. He is clearly an “insider” (he is a former National Security Council staffer) but exhibits a healthy level of detachment. And Kupchan displays a commendable willingness to adjust his grand vision to changing realities.'Read the full review, "We Are Not All Americans Now," on our website:theamericancon [...]

    10. A useful read explaining the shift of power from a more postmodern perspective. Kupchan is considered one of today's IR experts and is worth reading in order to understand accepted paradigms among the experts.

    11. The book presents a fascinating view of how the new international order will be shaped. We are used to the idea of one or two nations being the most significant and the most impactful. Kupchan argues that the new order will be driven by many powers having to collaborate and cooperate.

    12. Good for context on this subject but not that startling in its insights. I don't honestly remember many of them: not a good sign.

    13. Very good book that helped me expand my thinking on global governance issues. Very reasonable proposals are presented by Kupchan. Recommended for those less tolerant of others

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *