The Goldilocks Planet: The 4 Billion Year Story of Earth's Climate

The Goldilocks Planet The Billion Year Story of Earth s Climate Climate change is a major topic of concern today and will be so for the foreseeable future as predicted changes in global temperatures rainfall and sea level continue to take place But as Jan Zalas

  • Title: The Goldilocks Planet: The 4 Billion Year Story of Earth's Climate
  • Author: Jan Zalasiewicz Mark Williams
  • ISBN: 9780199593576
  • Page: 238
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Climate change is a major topic of concern today and will be so for the foreseeable future, as predicted changes in global temperatures, rainfall, and sea level continue to take place But as Jan Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams reveal in The Goldilocks Planet, the climatic changes we are experiencing today hardly compare to the changes the Earth has seen over the last 4.5 biClimate change is a major topic of concern today and will be so for the foreseeable future, as predicted changes in global temperatures, rainfall, and sea level continue to take place But as Jan Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams reveal in The Goldilocks Planet, the climatic changes we are experiencing today hardly compare to the changes the Earth has seen over the last 4.5 billion years.Indeed, the vast history that the authors relate here is dramatic and often abrupt with massive changes in global and regional climate, from bitterly cold to sweltering hot, from arid to humid They introduce us to the Cryogenian period, the days of Snowball Earth seven hundred million years ago, when ice spread to cover the world, then melted abruptly amid such dramatic climatic turbulence that hurricanes raged across the Earth We read about the Carboniferous, with tropical jungles at the equator where Pennsylvania is now and the Cretaceous Period, when the polar regions saw not ice but dense conifer forests of cypress and redwood, with gingkos and ferns The authors also show how this history can be read from clues preserved in the Earth s strata The evidence is abundant, though always incomplete and often baffling, puzzling, infuriating, tantalizing, seemingly contradictory Geologists, though, are becoming ever ingenious at deciphering this evidence, and the story of the Earth s climate is now being reconstructed in ever greater detail maybe even providing us with clues to the future of contemporary climate change.And through all of this, the authors conclude, the Earth has remained perfectly habitable in stark contrast to its planetary neighbors Not too hot, not too cold not too dry, not too wet the Goldilocks planet Description taken from the Oxford University Press s web site.

    One thought on “The Goldilocks Planet: The 4 Billion Year Story of Earth's Climate ”

    1. This is one of those books that I've been looking for a long time to explore. I didn't even realize it until I started listening. What the book does is takes the timeline of the geology and climate of the earth, and then explains the what and where in great detail. It was full of pure awesome. I can't tell you how many times I went back and re-listened to entire chapters because I was so into what I was getting out of it.I HIGHLY recommend this one. It's a true pop-sci book, but it manages to be [...]

    2. This one gets three stars for several reasons. First, if you don't actually know anything about geological history, this is a tough book because the language is very thick and hard to decipher if you don't understand the lingo at all. They try to keep it easy as possibly for the layman, but the subject matter still fights them at every turn. Second, it just feels a little dull covering 4+ billion years of history in under 250 pages. There were times I wanted them to elaborate a bit more. Finally [...]

    3. The Goldilocks Planet: The Four Billion Year Story of Earth's Climate takes a look at the Earth's climate from the planet's formation to the current age and then takes a look at what our future climate might look like. In this book, the authors reconstruct and describe how the Earth's climate has continuously altered over its 4.5 billion-year history. The story can be read from clues preserved in the Earth's strata, in fossils, in ancient air samples, in mineral samples, extinction events etc. T [...]

    4. Coney ZealleyFDSCI 209Bro. Tonks16 Mar. 2015Capstone Book Review: The Goldilocks Planet The Goldilocks Planet, an insipid look at the climate of earth by Jan Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams. And not just on the current weather, but on everything from the very beginning. Four Billion years of history all packed into 267 pages. And I thought it was impressive if we ever got past the industrial age in history class. The earth has had a vacillating climate system from its beginning. The Goldilocks Pla [...]

    5. This review was posted on Lenz Blog, 17 June 2012:I just bought the Kindle version of "The Goldilocks Planet, The 4 billion years story of Earth's climate". And I submitted the following review at , which I hope will appear on that site shortly.Update: has kindly decided to publish the review.Errors in grammar and spelling:1. At location 977, the text reads: "So when a palaeontologist looks at the fossils of penguins and walruses 100 million years hence, he, she, or it will discern".This must b [...]

    6. <4.5h @ 2x. Afterthought: books like this should be rather read than listened to, to better appreciate the mind-boggling numbers (i.e general scale of things in time/space/energy).Contents:(view spoiler)[Zalasiewicz J & Williams M (2012) (08:51) Goldilocks Planet, The - The 4 Billion Year Story of Earth's ClimateAcknowledgementsList of IllustrationsPrologueA Brief Word on Time01. Primordial Climate– Alternative histories– The climate of Hades– The evidence of the earliest strata– [...]

    7. I don't know why it is, but for me (and possibly for many general readers), books on earth science tend to be most dull read in all of popular science. I suppose biology is interesting because it's how we work, and physics and cosmology are interesting because it's how the universe works but earth science is saddled with impenetrable names for different periods of time, plenty of climate variations (yawn) and a lot of mud and bits of stone. As someone once said to me, 'When you've seen one stone [...]

    8. Appropriately, I fell asleep listening to Goldilocks last night! However, this version is not a fairy tale, it's the science of Earth's climate: The Goldilocks Planet. As a geoscientist with some familiarity of this subject I could visualize the classic maps and graphs referred to by the narrator of this audiobook, but for the general reader the hard copy/ebook versions would likely be preferable. The book covers all of the major concepts of palaeoclimate science that I would expect in upper lev [...]

    9. If you want to understand the Climate Change debates, this book is a proper introduction. The charts, alone, assist you in fathoming geological time scales. The key points of the book seem to be two - first, that Earth's climate in conducive to 'life as we know it' because of heat-trapping elements which formed an atmosphere to shield the planet's surface from solar radiation. Secondly, that the planet's climate history can be compared to a respiratory system - taking in (storing) massive amount [...]

    10. The title is wrong. It should be "World History: A Condensed Version of the Entire Story". That said, everything else is right. I have the Kindle edition and it's easy to get to the notes and back to the text. Illustrations fit nicely on the seven-inch screen. This is one of those books that you read while having access to for further embellishment when desired.In addition to reading about the history of the earth, (it is not just climate, but the entirety of geophysics, with the necessary chem [...]

    11. Had a big day of house cleaning up, so put on my headphones and listened to this book for a few hours. Absolutely wonderful. I am not a scientist, but I do like to read and watch docos on climate change, geology and earthquakes/volcanoes, so I can say that this book covered (very condensed mind you) the history of the planet and its climate science in about 300 pages! But its was done very well. Not too too scientific, not too pithy, good balance, lots of reasearch, well written and really inter [...]

    12. Excellent, extremely readable history of earths climate from silicic haze when the surface was still molten the snowball earth thru hothouse earth to icebox and now Holocene and anthropocene. May sound academic and dull but really engaging and wonderfully written. What a great summary drawing-together of the ten thousand or so geologic findings that have emerged since I studied geology (briefly) in college! So hard to make sense of the roiling mass that is the geologic literature, but this book [...]

    13. Enlightening to me.Enlightening to me.If you are looking for more factors that must come into play about global warming. Everything in science must be proven fact. Well we sure make a good attempt to prove our point. I wonder if these scientists allow tours of their workshops like factories. If you are anything near to being scientific, you want to see the proof, for yourself, of course.

    14. um, so somehow i thought this would be a good vacation read? definitely to sciencey for wine country heat daze still, i'm halfway through it and i'll probably finish it. mostly i'm bummed because the author spends way more words on the scientist involved and the study methodology than he does on trying to paint any imaginative/speculative picture of ancient earth climates. that would have been much more fun.

    15. Superb introduction to this topic - one of the best books I’ve read this year. Using the most up-to-date scientific appraisals, the authors describe what is known about the 4 billion year history of Earth’s climate. Written for the layman, the book is easy to read, engaging and superbly written. Highly recommended.

    16. This book was extremely informative - I have a new understanding of climate change after reading it. However, it was a bit difficult to get through just because of how academic it is. Overall, I really enjoyed it.

    17. An excellent overview of the history of Earth's climate. It made me want to dig deeper into this subject (and I'm sure I will).

    18. Very dry book; I read it as a textbook for one of my science classes at school. The content was dry, but very extenseive. Zalasiewicz is obviously very knowledgeble.

    19. must read for skeptics and believers alike. the appreciation of the delicate balance in the climate comes from a deeper understanding of chemistry and physics.

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