Circles Disturbed: The Interplay of Mathematics and Narrative

Circles Disturbed The Interplay of Mathematics and Narrative Circles Disturbed brings together important thinkers in mathematics history and philosophy to explore the relationship between mathematics and narrative The book s title recalls the last words of th

  • Title: Circles Disturbed: The Interplay of Mathematics and Narrative
  • Author: Apostolos Doxiadis Barry Mazur
  • ISBN: 9780691149042
  • Page: 288
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Circles Disturbed brings together important thinkers in mathematics, history, and philosophy to explore the relationship between mathematics and narrative The book s title recalls the last words of the great Greek mathematician Archimedes before he was slain by a Roman soldier Don t disturb my circles words that seem to refer to two radically different concerns thatCircles Disturbed brings together important thinkers in mathematics, history, and philosophy to explore the relationship between mathematics and narrative The book s title recalls the last words of the great Greek mathematician Archimedes before he was slain by a Roman soldier Don t disturb my circles words that seem to refer to two radically different concerns that of the practical person living in the concrete world of reality, and that of the theoretician lost in a world of abstraction Stories and theorems are, in a sense, the natural languages of these two worlds stories representing the way we act and interact, and theorems giving us pure thought, distilled from the hustle and bustle of reality Yet, though the voices of stories and theorems seem totally different, they share profound connections and similarities.A book unlike any other, Circles Disturbed delves into topics such as the way in which historical and biographical narratives shape our understanding of mathematics and mathematicians, the development of myths of origins in mathematics, the structure and importance of mathematical dreams, the role of storytelling in the formation of mathematical intuitions, the ways mathematics helps us organize the way we think about narrative structure, and much .In addition to the editors, the contributors are Amir Alexander, David Corfield, Peter Galison, Timothy Gowers, Michael Harris, David Herman, Federica La Nave, G.E.R Lloyd, Uri Margolin, Colin McLarty, Jan Christoph Meister, Arkady Plotnitsky, and Bernard Teissier.Apostolos Doxiadis is a writer whose books include Uncle Petros and Goldbach s Conjecture and Logicomix Barry Mazur is the Gerhard Gade University Professor in the Department of Mathematics at Harvard University His books include Imagining Numbers and Arithmetic Moduli of Elliptic Curves Princeton.Endorsements Circles Disturbed offers a range of possibilities for how narrative can function in mathematics and how narratives themselves show signs of a mathematical structure An intelligent, exploratory collection of writings by a distinguished group of contributors Theodore Porter, University of California, Los Angeles This collection is a pioneering effort to trace the hidden connections between mathematics and narrative It succeeds magnificently, and represents a very significant contribution that will appeal to the professional mathematician as well as the general educated reader The articles are written by top authorities in their fields Doron Zeilberger, Rutgers University The idea of a volume devoted to mathematics and narrative is a good one The strength of the present volume is the breadth of its outlook, and I would imagine a fairly diverse readership from a wide variety of perspectives Robert Osserman, professor emeritus, Stanford University description taken from Princeton University Press s web site

    One thought on “Circles Disturbed: The Interplay of Mathematics and Narrative”

    1. [3.5 stars]I've been wrestling with whether I want to give this book a higher score simply due to how much I like the concept, and how much I'd like to see more of this. And there's a lot to like in this book. As a math guy I often feel like math straddles the sciences and humanities both more than we'd like to admit, and while math is enshrined in the contemporary STEM quadrinity, it's inroads with the humanities aren't nearly as high up in the public focus (including my own focus, regrettably) [...]

    2. The idea of this collection of short essays is great, but the execution is disappointing. The introduction starts the collection out on a great foot, but the following first chapter, with historical inaccuracies and wild speculation, makes the reader skeptical of the rest of the essays. Arkady Plotnitsky has written the best section of this novel. Though some talk about fictional narrative with mathematics, many of the essays discuss the terms used when describing the actual history of mathemati [...]

    3. Truthfully, I didn't finish this book. It was simply over my head. This book was written for the very, very intelligent, and I am merely intelligent.

    4. The chapter by Doxiadis was very interesting and would have rated around 3.5 stars on its own. The remainder of the book however was merely ok.

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