Against Wind and Tide: Letters and Journals, 1947-1986

Against Wind and Tide Letters and Journals Why as an eager and talented writer has Anne Morrow Lindbergh published so relatively little in forty years of marriage asked reviewer John Barkham in After a promising start with those first b

  • Title: Against Wind and Tide: Letters and Journals, 1947-1986
  • Author: Anne Morrow Lindbergh Reeve Lindbergh
  • ISBN: 9780307907141
  • Page: 497
  • Format: ebook
  • Why, as an eager and talented writer, has Anne Morrow Lindbergh published so relatively little in forty years of marriage asked reviewer John Barkham in 1970 After a promising start with those first books on flying, she tapered off into long silences broken by an infrequent volume of verse or prose Many years later, Lindbergh replied with a quote from Harriet BeecheWhy, as an eager and talented writer, has Anne Morrow Lindbergh published so relatively little in forty years of marriage asked reviewer John Barkham in 1970 After a promising start with those first books on flying, she tapered off into long silences broken by an infrequent volume of verse or prose Many years later, Lindbergh replied with a quote from Harriet Beecher Stowe, who claimed that writing, for a wife and mother, is rowing against wind and tide In this sixth and final collection of Lindbergh s diaries and letters, taking us from 1947 to 1986, we mark her progress as she navigated a remarkable life and a remarkable century with enthusiasm and delight, humor and wit, sorrow and bewilderment, but above all devoted to finding the essential truth in life s experiences through a hard won spirituality and a passion for literature Between the inevitable squalls of life with her beloved but elusive husband, the aviator Charles A Lindbergh, she shepherded their five children through whooping cough, horned toads, fianc s, the Vietnam War, and their own personal tragedies She researched and wrote many books and articles on issues ranging from the condition of Europe after World War II to the meaning of marriage to the launch of Apollo 8 She published one of the most beloved books of inspiration of all time, Gift from the Sea She left penetrating accounts of meetings with such luminaries as John and Jacqueline Kennedy, Thornton Wilder, Enrico Fermi, Leland and Slim Hayward, and the Frank Lloyd Wrights And she found time to compose extraordinarily insightful and moving letters of consolation to friends and to others whose losses touched her deeply More than any previous books by or about Anne Morrow Lindbergh, Against Wind and Tide makes us privy to the demons that plagued this fairy tale bride, and introduces us to some of the people men as well as women who provided solace as she braved the tides of time and aging, war and politics, birth and death Here is an eloquent and often startling collection of writings from one of the most admired women of our time.

    One thought on “Against Wind and Tide: Letters and Journals, 1947-1986”

    1. I am so glad that Reeve Lindbergh (along with others in the family) decided to publish this last collection of her mother's letters and diaries, entailing the later years of her life.Having read all of the other collections in my 20's, it was gratifying and heartening to hear from an older Anne Morrow Lindbergh-- one who, as this book begins, was roughly my age now.And to realize that I still think of her as a kindred spirit.To feel like I've "grown up" with her while reading her words over the [...]

    2. Nothing was real to Anne Morrow Lindbergh until she wrote about it. Most of her adult life she made detailed journal entries and wrote copious letters exploring and explaining her thoughts in order to sharpen her powers of observation and reflection. After five earlier volumes published between the early 1970s and 1980, this collection of letters and journal entries covers the years from 1947 to 1986, as her five surviving children grow up, get married and have children and even grandchildren of [...]

    3. Decades before Betty Friedan published The Feminine Mystique in 1963, Anne Morrow Lindbergh was living “the problem that has no name,” pondering why she in particular, and American women in general, were so unhappy about their roles in American society.I spent my teens in the 1950s, that decade after the war when gender norms clamped down so hard on women, worried about what I could do with my life “besides get married.” In 1958, after spending my entire education in the same all-female [...]

    4. By choice, it has taken me over a year to read this book and I've savored it, bit by bit. To my mind Anne Morrow Lindbergh writes beautifully and many of her insights find fertile ground in me. I first discovered her in the seventies and have since read everything she has written. It's not for me to judge her life in those times from this current time. But being of a certain age, i can certainly relate to a fifties mindset. I think a lot of women had unspoken conflicts and were just going along [...]

    5. It's hard not to press, not to want to share and talk and communicate, with the new ease-comparative ease. I find this new pressure more insistent. Is it wrong, I wonder, to want to share? Is sharing an impossibility, ever? Should one give up such a dream: sharing all the little things But I find this longing in me to lean all one way, like a flower to the sun. I distrust the leaning, as if one might get off balance.

    6. Love reading about the life and times of this remarkable woman. This one, the last of her journals, was edited and published by her daughter Reeve. I am grateful for having had the opportunity to hear her read from her mother's journals before the book was actually released last spring (2012).

    7. What a gift Anne Morrow is. These letters are so thoughtful, so insightful. Really made me long for simpler times when writing a long letter was a normal course of events.

    8. In my twenties I discovered Anne Morrow Lindbergh's first book of her journals and letters Bring Me a Unicorn. I identified with her dreams of being a writer and being a Smith College student (I went to rival nearby women's college Mount Holyoke). I adored her thoughtful reflections and how her romance and later marriage to Charles Lindbergh pulled her out of her shell and made her an aviator as well as writer. I was soon collecting all of her volumes of letters and journals and reading through [...]

    9. I have always enjoyed Gift From the Sea and somehow felt that Morrow Lindbergh got the struggle of modern woman who are often desperate to balance the demands of family, career, and perhaps a space of one' own. Her letters and journal entries confirm that yes, she got it, and lived it. Some salacious details have emerged about her famous husband in the years since this was published and her daughter addresses them in the intro. She endured, which is after all, what we women do.

    10. 3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting glimpse into the personal life of the authorThis book, edited and with an introduction by her daughter, Reeve Lindbergh, is basically a chronological collection of Anne Morrow Lindbergh's letters and journal entries during the years 1947-1986. Written in a formal prose typical of writers of that time, this autobiographical account of AML's life and times is both interesting and thought-provoking. She analyzes everything down to the nth detail and, with supreme cand [...]

    11. It's startling to read the rest of the story, after years of being intimately familiar with her first five volumes of her diaries and letters. The last volume, War Within and Without, had been published in 1980. Now the rest of her story, in her own words, has been released from the contents of letters and journals from the second half of her life.Although Gift from the Sea is her most famous book, North to the Orient, Listen! the Wind, and all the volumes of her journals are well worth reading. [...]

    12. Anne Morrow Lindbergh, wife of aviator Charles Lindbergh, was a prolific letter and diary writer, novelist, poet, and non-fiction author. I read her book Gift of the Sea many years ago, and while I couldn't relate to everything she wrote about in that work, the writing was good and insightful, so when I saw this at the library I decided to give it a go.I wish I had not read the preface before reading the letters/diary entries. Lindbergh's daughter, author Reeve Lindbergh, writes in the preface a [...]

    13. As in all of Anne Morrow Lindbergh's writings, her beautiful character shines through despite towering self-doubt. Her life, tattered as it was by self-esteem issues, benefited C, as she called her Significent Other, raising him higher than he could ever have flown on his own. Although a skilled flyer and mapper of the heavens in her own right, these accomplishments remained dimmed in the blaze of fame that accompanied C's contributions to aviation.Among much else, Anne served as her husband's m [...]

    14. This book of letters and journals encompasses the day-to-day living, relationships with family and friends, insights into a writer's life, and revelations that come from a life filled with challenges, opportunities, heartache, disappointment, self-doubt, and aloneness.There's a lot to like about this book and good reason to read it. There is, however, extensive description of the beauty of natural surroundings that AML loved to capture. For me, the time lapses between entries, the feeling of con [...]

    15. After Anne Morrow Lindbergh's death in 1986, a group including family and friends gathered her writings from 1947 to the end of her life and put them in book form. There are many of the countless letters she wrote and her diary entries from various periods of her life.She didn't have an easy life by any means. Both she and Charles were super cautious about being recognized in public, having been traumatized by the media attention when their first child was abducted. They were also quite protecti [...]

    16. Having just read "The Aviator's Wife" I wanted more insight into Anne's life without reading a lengthy biography. The introduction by her daughter, Reeve, answered many of my questions, more so than Anne's letters and diary entries. (Perhaps I should've gone with a biography after all.) That being said, I did enjoy Anne's introspective style and a deeper glimpse into her life. The reading is slow going and because of that I decided not to finish the book."I had thought birth had taught me all th [...]

    17. Anne Morrow Lindbergh was an incredibly strong and insightful woman and writer. A pioneer in the field of aviation and writing. A strong woman to endure the tragic death of her first born child and to survive the media blitz surrounding that tragedy. Charles and Anne were the "William and Kate" of their era, constantly followed by the press. In this book she goes from hectic motherhood, through empty nest to widowhood with insight and aplomb. She has to rely on her own resources while her husban [...]

    18. I liked parts of this very much, especially the letters and diaries near the end where AML focuses on death and aging. But I didn't like it as much as I remembered liking her earlier collections of diaries and letters. Maybe because she didn't edit Against Wind & Tide? Maybe I've grown out of her? Many of the book's earlier letters are about not having the time to write. Yes, her husband Charles Lindbergh left her alone with five children much of the time, but she also had certain privileges [...]

    19. Although I found the book interesting and challenging, I almost wished I hadn't read it. AML was one of my heroines, especially after I married a pilot, and I had really enjoyed reading her previous diaries and letters. I was uncertain about this one, though, after reading her daughter Reeve's latest book, which revealed more than I had wanted to know about both Anne and Charles. This book underscored the crumbling of the pedestal and so was a sad read for me. There were some really excellent qu [...]

    20. Torn between "like it" and 'really liked it". I have loved her writings. This book takes place over 40 years and is a compilation of letters and journal entries pulled together by her children. I thought I would be bored, and in some places I am, but it is fascinating to watch how she changes and grows over 40 years. In some areas I can't believe what she puts up with in terms of life style and home life. IN other areas she is beyond her time. It does seem there are some pieces of time missingdy [...]

    21. I've loved all of her diaries and this one, while hugely condensed and edited, is satisfying if somewhat disjointed. I imagine if she had edited it herself that it would read more smoothly, but maybe not, as she had more to leave out. Her striving to be better, clearer, more able as a writer and more evenly balanced as a mother and wife, and a writer, is compelling and moving. Her struggle is right there, on the page, and mirrors what many women experience. I am sorry to think this is the last I [...]

    22. Anne Morrow Lindbergh's letters and diaries in this volume detail the distress she felt as a person who lived inside of herself at being a wife, mother, and friend with a very busy life. It is actually painful to read how much she just wants to go to her desk and write when she has 5 (or so) children and an extended family who all need her. In the last part of the book she talks about her philosophy of the meaning of life and of her preparations for death. I recommend this book only to those who [...]

    23. Lots of hand wringing old, facing death, divorce, separation, growing out of ill fitting molds, standing up for oneself.d raising kids mostly alone as CAL went with the wind explore, create new children, enrich his own legacy be rootless.All this book is edited after AML's deathl very discreet, genteel, by her children without passing judgmentt reveling in the glory of their famous parents.

    24. A really nice book. Anyone interested in Anne and her life would enjoy this or even if you just like reading letters and journals. I did think it might be easier to read if the entries were separated by category - letters, journals, etc. Very introspective and deep-thinking. I was struck by how different it is to communicate now vs then. She apparently often had no idea where Charles was - couldn't communicate with him like we can now.

    25. Anne Morrow Lindbergh's story in her own words much better than a biography. I read The Aviator's Wife and came away with an entirely different impression of AML - this was an important correction to the way I view her. These collected works provide insight into the mind of a wife, mother and writer who was constantly thinking through and evaluating her life in the context of her family and the world around her.

    26. needed footnotes in the body of the book vs end of the book as shown in the Kindle- the only challenge I've ever had ona kindle in 5 yrs of being the Kindle poster child. Intrigued to read this after loving "The Aviator's Wife,". "AW" holds pretty true (except some revelations near C's death) Truly fascinated at how selfish Charles Lindbergh was & amazed at how gracious his wife remained. Perhaps marriages were different in that time, but the children certainly owe much to their mother.

    27. I have always loved AML's letters and journals so I was thrilled when I saw there was one last volume edited by her children and published after her death. These were not the happiest years for AML--near the end of the book, she is in her late 70's and her friends and family members are dying and it is depressing. Even she, who wants to write one more book, just doesn't have it in her to write anymore and she is so tired and feels so old. Makes me sad.

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