Making a Presence: F. Holland Day in Artistic Photography

Making a Presence F Holland Day in Artistic Photography Boston photographer Fred Holland Day first distinguished himself in literary circles as a critic bibliophile and co founder of the progressive publishing firm Copeland and Day before turni

  • Title: Making a Presence: F. Holland Day in Artistic Photography
  • Author: Trevor J. Fairbrother
  • ISBN: 9780300180381
  • Page: 341
  • Format: Paperback
  • Boston photographer Fred Holland Day 1864 1933 first distinguished himself in literary circles as a critic, bibliophile, and co founder of the progressive publishing firm Copeland and Day before turning to photography in the 1880s By the turn of the century, he had established an international reputation as a leader in the Pictorialist movement, striving to gain acceptaBoston photographer Fred Holland Day 1864 1933 first distinguished himself in literary circles as a critic, bibliophile, and co founder of the progressive publishing firm Copeland and Day before turning to photography in the 1880s By the turn of the century, he had established an international reputation as a leader in the Pictorialist movement, striving to gain acceptance for photography as a fine art.Day s work ranged from intimate portraits of friends and fellow artists, to elaborate, costume driven self portraiture, including his Jesus Christ series, photographed in rural settings near his home in Norwood, Massachusetts Especially illuminating of Day s dual role as artist and advocate are the 50 plus images, reprised here, from a 1902 exhibition, in which Day posed for leaders in the newer photographic methods to demonstrate that the camera could be as expressive and sensitive an artistic tool as the brush or the etcher s needle.Making a Presence offers a dynamic composite portrait of an iconoclastic, independent artist, and of a man exquisitely expressive of his fin de si cle milieu.

    One thought on “Making a Presence: F. Holland Day in Artistic Photography”

    1. As an lover of earlier photography and as a groupie to the ghosts of those eccentric, yet exceedingly generous, group of late nineteenth-early twentieth Bostonian connoisseurs, collectors and donors who established Boston as a Temple to the Arts, I find it hard to be objective about this catalog, written by the impeccable Trevor Fairbrother to accompany the eponymous exhibition organized last year by the Addison Gallery of American Art. With an elegant and informative forward by Brian Allen, The [...]

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