Whispering Death: Australian Airmen in the Pacific War

Whispering Death Australian Airmen in the Pacific War In Whispering Death Mark Johnston one of Australia s leading experts on World War II explains vividly how than Australian airmen fought Japan from the Pacific War s first hours in to i

  • Title: Whispering Death: Australian Airmen in the Pacific War
  • Author: Mark D. Johnston
  • ISBN: 9781741759013
  • Page: 440
  • Format: Paperback
  • In Whispering Death, Mark Johnston, one of Australia s leading experts on World War II, explains vividly how than 130,000 Australian airmen fought Japan from the Pacific War s first hours in 1941 to its last in 1945 They clashed over a vast area, from India to Noumea, Bass Strait to the Philippines Merely flying over that region s boundless oceans and wild weather wIn Whispering Death, Mark Johnston, one of Australia s leading experts on World War II, explains vividly how than 130,000 Australian airmen fought Japan from the Pacific War s first hours in 1941 to its last in 1945 They clashed over a vast area, from India to Noumea, Bass Strait to the Philippines Merely flying over that region s boundless oceans and wild weather was dangerous enough for Australia s fliers, but their formidable enemies made it much perilous In their Zero fighters and Betty bombers they were initially too numerous, experienced and well armed for the few Australians who opposed them in Malaya, the Northern Territory, and New Guinea February 1942 brought the RAAF its darkest hour the bombing of Darwin, which no Australian fighter planes contested But in the months following, Australian aircrew won or contributed to great aerial victories in the air over Port Moresby, Milne Bay, the Papuan beachheads and the Bismarck Sea The American air force grew to dominate both the Japanese and their Australian ally, but until war s end Australian aircrew continued to battle in Pacific skies, and to die in flaming aircraft or at the hands of vindictive captors Some pilots, such as aces Clive Killer Caldwell and Keith Bluey Truscott became household names Certain Australian aircraft caught the public imagination too the Kittyhawk, the Spitfire and the plane dubbed Whispering Death for its eviscerating firepower and deceptively quiet engines the Beaufighter Australia s flight to victory was never smooth, thanks to internal squabbling at the RAAF s highest levels and a difficult relationship with the allies on whom Australia depended for aircraft and leadership So controversial were the RAAF s final operations that some of its most prominent pilots mutinied Based on thousands of official and private documents, Whispering Death makes for compelling reading.

    One thought on “Whispering Death: Australian Airmen in the Pacific War”

    1. For an American, the story of the RAAF was one little known, even to someone like me who has read quite a bit about the War in the Pacific. As such, I looked forward to fleshing out my knowledge.This book doesn't really disappoint in that regard as it is quite readable and goes through the genesis of the RAAF, the inter-war years, and then the calamities of Malaya, Dutch East Indies, Rabaul, and finally Darwin in April of 1942. As we all know, logistics kept the Japanese from expanding past thei [...]

    2. This is a very enjoyable read for anyone like me is very interested in the Pacific War when Australia was up against it and after a series of severe defeats had to fight for its existence. The valour of the aircrews, both Australian and US as outlined in this book is unbelievable with young airmen flying suicide missions to defend Australia. It does get a little repetitious towards the end, but that is understandable as it is essentially a history of the RAAF.

    3. Interesting look at the RAAFs involvement in the war in the Pacific. Detailed read based on variety of sources - gives an interesting insight to the effect the RAAF had in the campaign.

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