Once Were Pacific: Maori Connections to Oceania

Once Were Pacific Maori Connections to Oceania Native identity is usually associated with a particular place But what if that place is the ocean Once Were Pacific explores this question as it considers how M ori and other Pacific peoples frame the

  • Title: Once Were Pacific: Maori Connections to Oceania
  • Author: Alice Te Punga Somerville
  • ISBN: 9780816677566
  • Page: 148
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Native identity is usually associated with a particular place But what if that place is the ocean Once Were Pacific explores this question as it considers how M ori and other Pacific peoples frame their connection to the ocean, to New Zealand, and to each other through various creative works M ori scholar Alice Te Punga Somerville shows how and when M ori and other PaciNative identity is usually associated with a particular place But what if that place is the ocean Once Were Pacific explores this question as it considers how M ori and other Pacific peoples frame their connection to the ocean, to New Zealand, and to each other through various creative works M ori scholar Alice Te Punga Somerville shows how and when M ori and other Pacific peoples articulate their ancestral history as migratory seafarers, drawing their identity not only from land but also from water.Although M ori are ethnically Polynesian, and Aotearoa New Zealand is clearly a part of the Pacific region, in New Zealand the terms M ori and Pacific are colloquially applied to two distinct communities M ori are Indigenous, and Pacific refers to migrant communities from elsewhere in the region Asking how this distinction might blur historical and contemporary connections, Te Punga Somerville interrogates the relationship between indigeneity, migration, and diaspora, focusing on texts poetry, fiction, theater, film, and music, viewed alongside historical instances of performance, journalism, and scholarship.In this sustained treatment of the M ori diaspora, Te Punga Somerville provides the first critical analysis of relationships between Indigenous and migrant communities in New Zealand.

    One thought on “Once Were Pacific: Maori Connections to Oceania”

    1. A really, really fascinating book that discusses the nuances in contemporary studies of the Maori and Pacific peoples. For example: are the Maori to be considered Pacific in studies? Or in only certain studies? These are all questions that, admittedly, I had not truly considered until picking up this book. Somerville has a unique writing quality that makes the read fun, quick, but full of information. I was particularly fond of her analysis of Rawiri in the novel The Whale Rider by Witi Ihimaera [...]

    2. An in depth look at relations and collaborations between Maori and Pacific Island people through literature. Maori interactions with Pacific People are considered in these ways: Maori and Pacific Islanders within the nation state of New Zealand, Maori abroad in the Pacific, Maori who disparately engage Pacific communities in their writing, and Pacific Islanders who engage Maori in their writings. Te Punga Somerville draws not only from literature over the last 60 years, but also from popular cul [...]

    3. An often theoretical exploration of contemporary and historical connections between Māori and other Pacific Islanders.

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