God Here and Now

God Here and Now Karl Barth was without doubt one of the most significant religious thinkers of modern times His radical affirmation of the revealed truth of Christianity changed the course of Christian theology in

  • Title: God Here and Now
  • Author: Karl Barth
  • ISBN: 9780415304474
  • Page: 206
  • Format: Paperback
  • Karl Barth was, without doubt, one of the most significant religious thinkers of modern times His radical affirmation of the revealed truth of Christianity changed the course of Christian theology in the twentieth century and is a source of inspiration for countless believers Pope Pius XII declared that there had been nothing like Karl Barth s later thought since ThomasKarl Barth was, without doubt, one of the most significant religious thinkers of modern times His radical affirmation of the revealed truth of Christianity changed the course of Christian theology in the twentieth century and is a source of inspiration for countless believers Pope Pius XII declared that there had been nothing like Karl Barth s later thought since Thomas Aquinas God Here and Now offers a succinct and accessible overview of that thought In it, Barth outlines his position on the fundamental tenets of Christian belief, from the decision of faith to the authority of the Bible, and from the interpretation of grace to the significance of Jesus Christ In this way Barth challenges each and every reader to discover what it means to encounter God, here and now.

    One thought on “God Here and Now”

    1. This book provided a sort of mental landslide at an important time in my life. Barth is radical because he's so conservative and so aggressively so. An intellectual with a ruthless intelligence and a grinding thoroughness. He made me realize that Christianity makes sense only when viewed from the perspective of Christianity and without such a perspective it makes no sense. The swing that occurred with me philosophically against a wishy-washy universalism (prevalent in my thinking about religion [...]

    2. Generally lightweight, repetitive theology which asserts the primacy of the Bible and the untenability of ex cathedra-type statements. It was cool to see some of Hegel's ideas related to dialectical theology coming up here, buried of course, but Barth tries to reverse the "only individuals before God" idea of Kierkegaard's—that there are only democratic congregations. Similarly, Barth seems to hold something like a positive view of Christianity wherein justice comes about via divine commandmen [...]

    3. Reading Barth for the first time outside of a university setting, beyond a passage or two, was very interesting. On opening this book, I didn't realise how conservative Barth was. I expected many things to be questioned and tested in this book but his faith was not one of them. Although reading Barth can be grinding, I did have some A-HA moments. These mainly occurred in the chapters on the Church and Christian Ethics. I particularly rejoiced when he highlighted the hierarchy of the Church and t [...]

    4. Didn't understand all of it but think I caught some very vigorous ideas here. The one I like the most or at least remember best post-read is that of the church meaning in the original word 'ecclesia' the "event of its congregating" as opposed to referring to a specific institution or other. The event of congregating -- coming together to share together the experience of God.

    5. While I can't get on board with his specifically Reformed elements of his philosophy, I adore Barth for just about everything else. This book characterizes what I also admire most about Barth as a theologian: he's a 20th century Christian intellectual/academic and *gasp* he actually takes the Bible/faith seriously! Who knew Christian intellectuals still did that?! *glares at Caputo*

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