Selected Poems of Edward Thomas

Selected Poems of Edward Thomas No poetry has touched readers hearts deeply than the soldier poets of the First World War Published to commemorate the centenary of this stunning set of books with specially commissioned covers

  • Title: Selected Poems of Edward Thomas
  • Author: Edward Thomas Matthew Hollis
  • ISBN: 9780571235698
  • Page: 142
  • Format: Paperback
  • No poetry has touched readers hearts deeply than the soldier poets of the First World War Published to commemorate the centenary of 1914, this stunning set of books, with specially commissioned covers by leading print makers, is an essential gathering of our most beloved war poets introduced by leading poets and biographers of our present day.When Edward Thomas wasNo poetry has touched readers hearts deeply than the soldier poets of the First World War Published to commemorate the centenary of 1914, this stunning set of books, with specially commissioned covers by leading print makers, is an essential gathering of our most beloved war poets introduced by leading poets and biographers of our present day.When Edward Thomas was killed at the Battle of Arras in 1917 his poems were largely unpublished But in the years since his death, his work has come to be cherished for its rare, sustained vision of the natural world and as a mirror of England Walter de la Mare This edition, drawn from Thomas s manuscripts and typescripts as well as from his published works, offers an accessible introduction to this most resonant and relevant of poets.

    One thought on “Selected Poems of Edward Thomas”

    1. I found this a fascinating collection and insight into the genesis, craft, development and the mind of an author. Thomas seemingly began as a literary reviewer and critic, progressing to write books on commission and then prose and eventually verse (often revisiting works of prose to form the basis of verse). Indeed it took Thomas until he was 36 until he wrote his first poem in 1914 – ‘Up in The Wind’. Thomas suffered from, was diagnosed with and treated for depression and indeed did make [...]

    2. Do I remember Adlestrop?This was one of my A-Level set texts. Now, in hindsight, it seems absolutely crazy that I sat down and read these and worse wrote essays and even worse essays with opinions when I knew nothing of his context as a poet, of his work as a literary editor or of his friendship with Robert Frost (some similarities between their verse hovers on the edge of my consciousness) (view spoiler)[and how easy it is to forget what span of time Frost's life encompassed, from the first wor [...]

    3. therapythroughtolstoy/Thomas's poetry so beautifully encapsulates what England means to him, but also questions deeper concerns of belonging and nationality. Thomas felt torn between London, where his work and writing circles were based, and the English countryside that he commemorates in his writing. Yet Thomas's Welsh heritage led him to doubt whether he could truly be "English". He felt that living in Englandwas “like a homesickness, but stronger”, and the closest he could feel to belongi [...]

    4. Probably the greatest English nature poet after Wordsworth. Also one of the exceptionally talented war poets (Owen, Rosenberg, Gurney, Thomas are the finest in my opinion). Except it doesn't read like war poetry because it's so deeply bound up with Thomas's love of English landscapes - the soil, the wind, rivers, coombes, his countrymen the birds (not the jingoists whom he despised) - that it's also nature poetry. Then that recurrent phrase "the dead", and that hovering sense behind the intense [...]

    5. I throughly enjoyed this collection of poetry. There definitely were a few that stood out more to me: The Owl, Interval, Like the Touch of Rain, Rain, The Thrush, What will they do? and Beauty. I definitely recommed this collection of poetry to anyone who enjoys poetry or has a love of it.

    6. This is the audiobook version of Edward Thomas poetical works. Barnaby Edwards does a good job with the reading.

    7. Have enjoyed this volume of poems from one of the "war poets"- although none of his poems were ever written from the trenches. He died in France in 1917 after just 3 months at the Front. His poems are filled with lots of countryside imagery and wonderful observations of nature and country people. Thomas is a perceptive writer and he produces evocative pictures, albeit generally with an undercurrent of melancholy (he struggled with depression). Adelstrop remains my favourite:"Yes. I remember Adel [...]

    8. I picked up the book knowing nothing about Thomas and by the ends I was in love with his words. I'll never be able to look at violets nor snow nor rain the same again. Not to mention the heartbreak of reading his journal entries from his time fighting in the war. With his simple language Thomas breaks through to the core of what he wants to say, rather than dancing around the bush while throwing about a bunch of complicated, fancy words. If you are unsure, look up and read at least these poems: [...]

    9. After reading Ted Hughes poetry which consisted mostly about nature I wasn't looking forward to reading Edward Thomas's Selected Poems. But after reading this, it pretty much changed my views on poems based around nature. I loved how in every poem Thomas managed to relate nature to every aspect in his poetry, whether it revolving around the themes melancholy or love he depicted it beautifully.

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