Dear Editor: Poems

Dear Editor Poems Each prose poem in this extraordinary volume is an impassioned letter to a nameless editor from a poet seeking publication for her collection about chess sainthood and the poet s lonely childhood Ta

  • Title: Dear Editor: Poems
  • Author: Amy Newman
  • ISBN: 9780892553877
  • Page: 353
  • Format: Paperback
  • Each prose poem in this extraordinary volume is an impassioned letter to a nameless editor from a poet seeking publication for her collection about chess, sainthood, and the poet s lonely childhood Taken individually, the poems display a dazzling originality together, they form an exquisite exploration of memory and longing.

    One thought on “Dear Editor: Poems”

    1. Before DEAR EDITOR appeared in the world, it was a truth universally acknowledged that no further poetry collections could succeed, much less equal, Lucie Brock-Broido’s THE MASTER LETTERS, but Newman has pulled off an well-nigh impossible feat: she adheres far more strictly to epistolary decorum, but what bleeds through the lines is a universal human pulse, veins opening in the form of words; or, to put things a different way, Newman’s voice has its locus in the deepest parts of the self, r [...]

    2. Amy Newman's Dear Editor is a collection of prose poems written in the form of submission letters promoting a manuscript she calls X = Pawn Capture. Referrals to chess, saints, and family members are used to carry the emotional weight of each of the poems. They begin as quite simple offerings but increase in complexity near the end as Newman's reflections on memory and a sense of loss become more apparent. I suppose chess is a metaphor for life. Newman plainly states the litany of saints is not. [...]

    3. I love this book as the construct is terrific - a series of letters to publishers asking them to publish her fictional poetry book, "X=Pawn Capture," which, meta-liciously, she describes so fully in the book that we get a wonderful sense of her family history, her mental connections between chess and martyrs, and her inner insecurities as a writer. I laughed out loud a couple of times, and since my father was a huge chess maniac and taught me some of the main moves of chess as a little girl and [...]

    4. A lovely book of prose poems, part memoir, meditative and often funny. Over the month or so it's been on my bedside table, it's sort of quietly taken root and evolved there: while I was reading it, I thought that what I was really reading was one long poem, despite its being organized as many small ones (They are all presented as a series of submissions to an editor.) I wondered whether the individual segments - as I was thinking of them then - could stand alone as poems. Now I've finished it an [...]

    5. • I'm not one to get hung up on "what is poetry?" but while this is one of my favorite books I've read in years, I'll have to tag it something obnoxious like "epistolary memoir". (It's written as a series of submission letters for a poetry manuscript called "X=Pawn Capture" with thematic connections between the game and the narrator's grandparents.)• The gradual expansion of detail within a rigid conceit is powerful - it reminds me most of Stephen Dixon's "Interstate" in its use of a constra [...]

    6. This is an amazing book of poems. I'm a sucker for prose poems anyway but these were simply some of the best prose poems I've ever read. The vast beautiful stew of Catholicism, saints, writing, poetry, writing workshops, stunted relationships, the failure of language to truly capture human experience, the small things we do equaling the big things we become, these were all encapsulated in this dynamic, ferocious, compact book. Highest recommendation.(Yes, you too, even if you don't "get" poetry. [...]

    7. This was a humorous book to read. I read it on the beach on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Each poem is set up as if it's a letter to the Editor. Great idea!

    8. Stunning collection of prose poems. I cannot explain or find words to express how much I enjoyed this collection. Simply wonderful.

    9. Each poem in this collection is a letter to a nameless editor from a poet seeking publication for her collection about chess, sainthood, and the poet's lonely childhood. It's an interesting read, but what I liked best about it was how it reminded me of the mythology of the saints. My favorite excerpts are below:From page 50My grandmother would not permit a dress of any fabric you might find on Cinderella or Rapunzel, such as silks or cashmeres, gorgettes or chiffons, although on every holy card [...]

    10. A collection of prose poems, all of them in the form of cover letters to an editor who might publish them-- most of them open in the same way, introducing the manuscript project the poems are taken from (a book of poems about chess, called something like X= Pawn Capture), the poems then proceed to offer a lyrical biographical vignette, capturing the speaker/ Newman in her childhood, caught in bonds between her grandmother and -father.It's a moving book, and the more poems I read, the more I like [...]

    11. This is one of my favourite poetry books of all time. Written as a series of prose poems, through the medium of letters to a journal editor Newman uses a game of chess to explore the dynamics and relationships within a family. Brilliant, clever and inspiring.

    12. This is an interesting little book. It's a series of prose poems addressed to editors, asking them to publish the speaker's poems. I find it more interesting as a concept than as poetry per se.

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