Theory As History: Essays on Modes of Production and Exploitation

Theory As History Essays on Modes of Production and Exploitation Winner of the Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial PrizeThe essays collected herein deal with the Marxist notion of a mode of production the emergence of medieval relations of production the ori

  • Title: Theory As History: Essays on Modes of Production and Exploitation
  • Author: Jairus Banaji
  • ISBN: 9781608461431
  • Page: 228
  • Format: Paperback
  • Winner of the 2011 Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial PrizeThe essays collected herein deal with the Marxist notion of a mode of production, the emergence of medieval relations of production, the origins of capitalism, the dichotomy between free and unfree labor, and essays in agrarian history They demonstrate the importance of reintegrating theory with history and ofWinner of the 2011 Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial PrizeThe essays collected herein deal with the Marxist notion of a mode of production, the emergence of medieval relations of production, the origins of capitalism, the dichotomy between free and unfree labor, and essays in agrarian history They demonstrate the importance of reintegrating theory with history and of bringing history back into historical materialism.

    One thought on “Theory As History: Essays on Modes of Production and Exploitation”

    1. While I do not always agree with Banaji, particularly of his dismissal of the English agrarian capital thesis and the Brenner/Woods reading as an "orthodoxy," his discussions of Egypt, the late medieval Islamic trade development, the problems with the "Asiatic modes of production" and "tributary mode of production" as well as historical blind spots in general Marxist, and, ironically given their third world focus, specifically Maoist misreadings of past. Banaji's strength is his knowledge of per [...]

    2. I have to say that this book is the single most inspiring piece of historical materialist theory that I have ever read since reading Marx's own "18th Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte." Banaji reinvigorates historical materialist theory by injecting it with the most thorough understanding of global history that I have seen. He analyzes China, India, Russia, Byzantium, medieval Europe, and even the cultural influences and biases that Marx and many of his first Western followers held. Banaji's descripti [...]

    3. More rewarding than frustrating but only slightly. I suspect that if Banaji held himself to the same standards as he holds everyone else, he would have much, much less to write about.

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