The Collapsing Universe

The Collapsing Universe Was the mysterious megaton blast that flattened a Siberian forest in actually caused by a small black hole Does matter drawn into a black hole reappear out the other side as anti matter a sor

  • Title: The Collapsing Universe
  • Author: Isaac Asimov
  • ISBN: 9780671817381
  • Page: 370
  • Format: Paperback
  • Was the mysterious 30 megaton blast that flattened a Siberian forest in 1908 actually caused by a small black hole Does matter drawn into a black hole reappear out the other side as anti matter, a sort of mirror image of the universe as we know it Could back holes explain the Big Bang Does their existence raise the possibility that matter can move faster than the spWas the mysterious 30 megaton blast that flattened a Siberian forest in 1908 actually caused by a small black hole Does matter drawn into a black hole reappear out the other side as anti matter, a sort of mirror image of the universe as we know it Could back holes explain the Big Bang Does their existence raise the possibility that matter can move faster than the speed of light The noted scientist and science fiction author explores the exciting implications of black holes, taking the reader on an engaging tour from the atom s innermost core to the outermost reaches of the universe.

    One thought on “The Collapsing Universe”

    1. When I started reading Asimov's book this week, written over 30 years ago, I figured I'd be the better-informed, having absorbed current scientific knowledge in over a decade of technical education and more so for being a geek in general.Turns out I was wrong.Asimov writes about cosmic phenomena with heavy emphasis on basic concepts, without ever going over the head of the layman, while imparting new knowledge in almost every page. I learned so many things about the Earth, planets, the solar sys [...]

    2. It's been three decades since I first read this book. I decided to read it again after having just read Origins: Fourteen Billion Years of Cosmic Evolution by Neil deGrasse Tyson because it seemed that Asimov had told a similar story, but in the opposite order in terms of mass. That is, the latter books starts with the universe and works its way down to planets, and Asimov's starts with the smallest objects, working its way progressively up to the most massive and the universe as a whole.Asimov [...]

    3. The Good Doctor once again explains Cosmology in lucid terms. He starts off with simple premises, known facts, composes and slowly leads up to higher concepts, ultimately leading to the concept of "Black Hole". The book had a "trill" factor to it, as we discover the nature of black holes and what constitutes a black hole and how the universe might have formed.I was "wow"ed by this book.

    4. I like this book because it provides a nice and simple view of physics, astronomy, and quantum mechanics. Simple to read and pretty simple to understand. An easy read.

    5. This book blew my mind, even though I'm not on speaking terms with physics most of the time I understood everything and I am left a little speechless by some of the ideas explored here. I think when we got to the wormholes I was already gone. Loved the writing style. Would recommend.

    6. I just wish we could have another Isaac Asimov in our time, to explain with such clarity and simplicity the advancetments of cosmology as he does in this book. Marvellous!

    7. I've always loved black holes and I've always wanted to read Asimov, but I never realized how well the two would go together.It's extremely approachable, for the content concerned. He writes a lot like Sagan in that -even though astronomy requires a ton of math- he simplifies it and mostly states it in comparative terms like "1.4 times the mass of the Sun" rather than "2.7846 × 1030 kg".The best part about this book, for me, wasn't even the black holes themselves -it was everything else leading [...]

    8. Прегледах “Гравитационната гибел на Вселената” с цел да си припомня някои факти относно Вселената, така че да ми е по-лесно за по-сложните четива на тази тематика, които по определени причини бях оставил на заден план.Азимов, като един от най-известните фантасти, е оставил [...]

    9. Interesting enough but it does drag in parts. This (subjectively) suffers in comparison, I think, simply because I recently read Davies' The Last Three Minutes, which covered much the same ground and was really enjoyable.In general, I've read a handful of Asimov's science books now, and sometimes it does feel a bit repetitive. I understand that in popular science you've got to start from the basics to ground your audience, but I feel like I've read something like the first chapter several times [...]

    10. I read this book in high school to learn about black holes. Much theory about astronomy has been advanced since this book was written probably without contradicting the very clear explanation of different stellar bodies in space this book gives. The progressive discussion Asimov uses in this book is very easy to follow and I went away from it having learned much that I was able to recount again to others. I do not personally know if scientists agree today that the universe is collapsing, there i [...]

    11. A Physics book. This is basically a book explaining how the theory of black holes came to be, and the physical evidence in nature to back it up. As of the writing of this book there had been no black holes discovered, and I did a quick Google search, and my initial impression is that they still have not found any. There is always the possibility that they are out there, just not where they can be detected from earth. Written in layman's terms.

    12. Un magnifico saggio per chi volesse avvicinarsi a come una stella nasce e muore e lascia memoria fisica di se'e non e' una metafora

    13. This book is awesome and scary in the same time. The scales, the predictions, the unknown - they frightened me. I recommend it to everyone who wants to learn more about our universe.

    14. I learned a great deal about astro physics from this book! Well written and easy to understand, it's a very interesting book!

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