Medieval Cuisine of the Islamic World: A Concise History with 174 Recipes

Medieval Cuisine of the Islamic World A Concise History with Recipes Vinegar and sugar dried fruit rose water spices from India and China sweet wine made from raisins and dates these are the flavors of the golden age of Arab cuisine This book a delightful culinary

  • Title: Medieval Cuisine of the Islamic World: A Concise History with 174 Recipes
  • Author: Charles Perry Lilia Zaouali
  • ISBN: 9780520247833
  • Page: 374
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Vinegar and sugar, dried fruit, rose water, spices from India and China, sweet wine made from raisins and dates these are the flavors of the golden age of Arab cuisine This book, a delightful culinary adventure that is part history and part cookbook, surveys the gastronomical art that developed at the Caliph s sumptuous palaces in ninth and tenth century Baghdad, drew insVinegar and sugar, dried fruit, rose water, spices from India and China, sweet wine made from raisins and dates these are the flavors of the golden age of Arab cuisine This book, a delightful culinary adventure that is part history and part cookbook, surveys the gastronomical art that developed at the Caliph s sumptuous palaces in ninth and tenth century Baghdad, drew inspiration from Persian, Greco Roman, and Turkish cooking, and rapidly spread across the Mediterranean In a charming narrative, Lilia Zaouali brings to life Islam s vibrant culinary heritage.The second half of the book gathers an extensive selection of original recipes drawn from medieval culinary sources along with thirty one contemporary recipes that evoke the flavors of the Middle Ages Featuring dishes such as Chicken with Walnuts and Pomegranate, Beef with Pistachios, Bazergan Couscous, Lamb Stew with Fresh Apricots, Tuna and Eggplant Pur e with Vinegar and Caraway, and Stuffed Dates, the book also discusses topics such as cookware, utensils, aromatic substances, and condiments, making it both an entertaining read and an informative resource for anyone who enjoys the fine art of cooking.

    One thought on “Medieval Cuisine of the Islamic World: A Concise History with 174 Recipes”

    1. I found this book inspirational, as a cookbook and as a work of history. First, for the cookbook: Cooking all over the world has, historically, been a trade learned through apprenticeship and practice, rarely through books. As such, cookbooks as well as individual recipes appear only scarcely in most cultures until well after the beginning of the 19th century…not true of Islamic cultures. The Islamic world from Baghdad to Córdoba began creating cookbooks as early as the 10th century A.D. Reci [...]

    2. La storia attraverso il cibo. Incroci, commessure, melange e fusioni. Ricette medioevali arricchite di aneddoti per meglio "gustare" ciò che spesso abbiamo solo orecchiato, magari grazie a qualche ristorante a la page o alla recensione del fùdbloggher mainstrim. Rispetto agli originali arabi c'è qualche discrepanza, forse l'autrice non li ha letti in lingua (d'altronde stiamo parlando di manoscritti, averne delle copie non è così facile o immediato). Ciò non ostante il melting pot che ci p [...]

    3. The subject matter is presented as dry as possible (to make sure no one’s having too much fun with history) but despite the academic desiccation, underneath that is a suggestion of a fascinating time period and culture.

    4. Lilia ZaoualiThis is not my review, it is information on the author. Source: narrazionidamore/index.Lilia Zaouali è nata nel 1960 a Sfax, in Tunisia. Parla e scrive in arabo, francese, italiano e inglese. Dopo aver concluso il dottorato al Dipartimento di Studi arabi e islamici dell’Università Sorbonne -Paris-IV, ha insegnato Antropologia del mondo musulmano all’Università Paris-VII e presso la Sarah Lawrence American Academy. Si è dedicato poi alla studio della storia dei porti maghrebi [...]

    5. This actually, is an excellent book, with lotsof very interesting information not always directly connected to the subject of food. My reservations are purely academic. This is published in a series on food history by the University of California Press. There isn't a bibliography as such. Being sort of a cook book, one might allow for the lack of one, and the author does list and discuss the four main food manuscripts the recipies come from or may have been based on. However, the first half of t [...]

    6. I was excited to see this unusual book filled with exotic recipes that sound delicious. Unfortunately, the text is very difficult to follow, especially if you are using it for directions. The author clearly is excited about the material and encourages the reader to "experiment." For folk who have not "experimented" with unusual spices and ingredients, this is not a good selection. The bulk of the text is recipes from the medieval world and they do not use measurements or times. These are a bit c [...]

    7. Islam at the Table: From the Middle Ages to the Present--a study of medieval cuisine of the Islamic Mediterranean drawn from the many cookbooks and surviving traditions, showing the long trade lengths (rice and ginger from China), Berber influences (couscous and Tagine methods), ingredients local to the Middle East (sumac/za'atar, eggplants, sugarcane, lemons, rose-water), halal rules and the available baking ovens and cooking surfaces. With sidelights on etiquette and cleanliness rules, as well [...]

    8. Zaouali's book is full of very interesting historical information on Muslim culture and food in the Islamic world during the Middle Ages. Based on four "cookbooks" written between the 10th and 13th Centuries, she discusses the ingredients available, various cooking processes, cookware, diet, and how dishes have changed over time. A large portion of the book is dedicated to recipes, which come from the cookbooks Zaouali examines.

    9. Lovers of food history will appreciate this fine volume from Lilia Zaouali, which summarizes and introduces readers to medieval Islamic elite cookery. A collection of recipes at the end permit readers to personally savor and serve history on the table. This would be a fun book for a small group to study and share over a meal prepared from the recipes included.

    10. Fascinating and scholarly read. Plenty of recipes, but very much a history and not just a cookbook. One quibble - I badly wish it had a glossary for the unfamiliar dish et al names (especially the ones similar enough for confusion) in the text so that they can be easily verified vs going through the index

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