A Singular Man

A Singular Man What will happen to George Smith Mysteriously rich and desperately lonely George appears to be under attack from all quarters his former wife and four horrible children are suing to get his money his

  • Title: A Singular Man
  • Author: J.P. Donleavy
  • ISBN: 9780871132659
  • Page: 142
  • Format: Paperback
  • What will happen to George Smith Mysteriously rich and desperately lonely, George appears to be under attack from all quarters his former wife and four horrible children are suing to get his money his dipsomaniacal housekeeper is trying to arouse his carnal interest his secretary, the beautiful, blond Miss Thomson, will barely give him the time of day Making matters eWhat will happen to George Smith Mysteriously rich and desperately lonely, George appears to be under attack from all quarters his former wife and four horrible children are suing to get his money his dipsomaniacal housekeeper is trying to arouse his carnal interest his secretary, the beautiful, blond Miss Thomson, will barely give him the time of day Making matters even worse are the threatening letters Dear Sir Only for the moment are we saying nothing Yours, etc Present Associates.Despite such precautions as a two inch thick surgical steel door and a bullet proof limousine, Smith remains worried So he undertakes to build a giant mausoleum, complete with plumbing, in which to live Hunter S Thompson called reading this book like sitting down to an evening of good whisky and mad laughter in a rare conversation somewhere on the edge of reality.

    One thought on “A Singular Man”

    1. This is another book that had a profound influence on me when I was younger.Just out of interest I recently went back and read it again.It is easy to read this book as just about the content, malarky, high jinks, sex and wealth. But there is a poetic melancholia that runs underneath everything in this book. I think it was the first book that resonated within me as in someone had given a name to something that I had felt at the core of me ever since I can remember.I feel a bit different these day [...]

    2. Donleavy's great accomplishment in his second novel is to make the reader sympathise with one of the 1%. And it is sympathy, rather than envy. Everyone wants a piece of George Smith and, while he may have more cash than the average Donleavy lead, as well as the usual quota of impossible yearning, he seems lacking in some crucial quality - call it gumption? Thus rendered something of an eternal victim, without the lunatic vigour of a Schultz whereby to convert upward from passivity to heroism. Fo [...]

    3. Hunter S. Thompson calls the Ginger Man by this author his favorite and the most influential book on his own career. This novel is equally well respected by the media of that day, but the book is a disaster to the modern reader, coming across as a weak imitation of Sinclair Lewis' Babbitt crossed with the work of Henry Miller (though not nearly as risque). The main fault of the book is that the exposition between dialog--indeed the two books mentioned here were plays as well--is the sort of Beat [...]

    4. Hilarious as always, but also harsher in the glaring light of day, more pessimistic than the other Donleavy I've read, despite having much of the same set-up; our hero is an orphan, a gentleman - even when falling in shite - and finds himself the sexual object of just about any and every attractive female who falls across his path. This should be objectionable, but as always is written with such self deprecation, even smatters of self loathing, that I fell for poor not-so-sweet George Smith. Old [...]

    5. So it seems (on the basis of this and The Ginger Man) that Donleavy's a genius, and I wish it hadn't taken me so long to get into him. Drags a bit in the middle, where it feels like he's just stretching, but beyond that it's both wildly funny and desperately sad. Toward the end, as it's just beautiful line after beautiful line, I felt pretty wrung out. Now to go through all of JPD's books and hope that they continue to approach this level.

    6. how could one review a novel such as this. the plot is loose and at times absurd. there is really no beginning middle an end. our protagonist finds himself in constant conflict, albeit no always resolved. but the writing is terrific. heavy and at times must be reread to truly understand. oh so worth it. donleavy is one of the most fun authors i have read.

    7. Still a favourite. It's got one of his most creative premises, some of his funniest moments, as well as one of the saddest scenes I've read in a book. If you have to read one Donleavy book, this might be the one.

    8. I was really surprised that while almost everyone who read this book on liked it, nobody reviewed it. Oh well, no reason to buck the trend.

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