Nothing

Nothing Years after having an affair that almost ruined their respective marriages Jane Weatherby and John Pomfret are reunited when their children decide to get married despite questions regarding their pos

Nothing Definition of Nothing by Merriam Webster Pronoun There s nothing in my hands She knows nothing of our plans You have nothing to worry about There s nothing fun to do around here You think that s bad It s nothing compared to what I Nothing Nothing, used as a pronoun subject, denotes the absence of a something or particular thing that one might expect or desire to be present We found nothing, Nothing was there or the inactivity of a thing or things that are usually or could be active Nothing moved, Nothing happened. Nothing Synonyms, Nothing Antonyms Thesaurus Synonyms for nothing at Thesaurus with free online thesaurus, antonyms, and definitions Find descriptive alternatives for nothing. Nothing definition of nothing by The Free Dictionary Now he certainly believed that he had nothing to fear for himself, but he wanted first to send somebody else in order to see how he stood with regard to his office. The Script Nothing Official Video YouTube Oct , The Script s official music video for Nothing Click to listen to The Script on Spotify As featured on Science Nothing Home Facebook Nothing , likes talking about this danceontheblacktop

  • Title: Nothing
  • Author: Henry Green
  • ISBN: 9781564782601
  • Page: 116
  • Format: Paperback
  • Years after having an affair that almost ruined their respective marriages, Jane Weatherby and John Pomfret are reunited when their children decide to get married despite questions regarding their possible kinship and the fact that they have almost no money to their name Afraid that Mary Pomfret and Philip Weatherby are destined for the working class, Jane and John attempYears after having an affair that almost ruined their respective marriages, Jane Weatherby and John Pomfret are reunited when their children decide to get married despite questions regarding their possible kinship and the fact that they have almost no money to their name Afraid that Mary Pomfret and Philip Weatherby are destined for the working class, Jane and John attempt to stall the development of the wedding plans by having endless conversations about, well, nothing This gives Jane a shrewd, resourceful widow the opportunity to embark on a scheme to lure John away from his current love interest As the plot advances through discussions filled with misdirections and omissions, Green demonstrates that there is nothing like the spoken word to conceal one s true intentions One of Green s final novels, Nothing is a worthy addition to the varied tradition of English literature that includes Virginia Woolf and Evelyn Waugh.

    One thought on “Nothing”

    1. So, I thought I’d give you NOTHING but the basic plot this time. Well, a middle-aged widow invites her lover and her old friends, including her ex-lover, to her son’s 21st birthday. The son uses the opportunity and announces his wish to marry his mother’s ex-lover’s daughter. Plans are made, but they all come to NOTHING, and in the end, the mother marries her ex-lover while their children break up. That’s it. NOTHING else. Easy and straightforward. Oh, but one of the characters disagre [...]

    2. Less Than Earnest‘It’s a damnable thing when a chap can only see his mistress on Sunday afternoons, don’t you think my dear? Pressures of work don’t you know? And even then she might decide to visit her mother. Then the chap would have to visit Jane instead. Damned inconvenient isn’t it my dear? Oh look, there’s Jane now. Is that Richard she’s with? I didn’t know Richard’s wife was out of town. She looks well doesn’t she? I do love you so terribly dearest. It’s not too late [...]

    3. A thousand little nothings, which make up a few big somethings; which in the end make up a life. It is interesting to have an ear to the door of those who gossip, and chatter, and make rivers of small talk: I've listened in, myself, a thousand times: in restaurants, while waiting to be served, and you're an elbow's angle from the next table; queuing at the bank, the supermarket, the theatre; sitting at a reception area in doctors' offices and hospital waiting rooms. It's amazing to me what escap [...]

    4. Not always, but sometimes, it's good to start a review or article by saying something vaguely sacrilegious. How about this? On diving into Nothing by Henry Green, I immediately was reminded of the TV series Seinfeld, a show explicitly about nothing, not nothing in the Sartrean sense, but nothing in the sense of "well, this is all very funny excited we become about."The other analogue that occurred to me, because Green's Nothing is largely exquisitely wrought dialogue, is the William Gaddis novel [...]

    5. I mainly bought this because it's a Hogarth Press edition, and I thought it would be cool to own one of them. And also I've vaguely wanted to read Green's Back ever since I studied an extract of it back in high school, and this is the closest I've been able to get without expending any particular effort.But this was a lot of fun. Interesting narrative style, funny, interesting characters, interesting plot, great ending.

    6. I'm gonna call bullshit on Henry Green. Well, maybe not on Henry himself, but on John Updike and the others of his ilk responsible for that buzz around Henry and his 9 short novels that led me to believe I had finally stumbled across the Rosetta Stones of postmodern fiction. A writer's writer's writer. (Someone actually said that; I bought it.) Lyrical, dazzling gems. Stylistically innovative, like no other. Henry Green was a rich British kid who wrote his first book, Blindness, at 21, and follo [...]

    7. reread 8/2/12utterly and unabashedly charming and delightful. years after having an affair that almost ruined their respective marriages, jane weatherby and john pomfret are reunited when their children decide to get married despite questions regarding their possible kinship and the fact that they have almost no money to their name. afraid that mary pomfret and philip weatherby are destined for the working-class, jane and john attempt to stall the development of the wedding plans by having endle [...]

    8. "Don't you find your own children so remote?" -- Something is slightly askew in this oedipal drama about the nihilism of getting what just you want.

    9. Decades before Rachel Cusk was born, Henry Green wrote his novels with an annihilated perspective. Yes, Henry Green. Let’s take Nothing, Henry Green’s wonderful eighth and penultimate novel as an example. Viewed in terms of plot, Nothing is the most conventional of the eight Green novels that I’ve read: it begins sensibly with a logical temporal start point and wraps up satisfyingly with a logical end. I’ve found this to be unusual among Green’s novels, which are often launched midway [...]

    10. Henry Green is endlessly praised by the likes of John Updike as a somewhat overlooked master. Though he is noted for a particularly elegant and distinguished prose style, this book is almost entirely dialog with only a few rapturous descriptive passages. His view of people (at least people in mid-20th century England) is a bit cynical; the characters in this book go from a graceless youth where the principal sentiment seems to be embarrassment about their parents who in turn epitomize a pompous [...]

    11. 3/5 for the plot, which turns out to be annoying, not the writing, which as usual is technical, brilliant and technically brilliant, stunning - how? how did he even think of it? But the plot is the oldest in the world (a complete bitch manipulates everyone around her - bitch is actually the only word, and only a woman can be a bitch because only a woman has the intelligence to manipulate, by conversation and social signals, everyone around her - some women can, but no men - i say this as a woman [...]

    12. A light story about romantic relationships in mid-20th century London. The main characters are from families that are quickly losing their wealth, but things haven't yet gotten so bad that they've really had to change their ways. When the children of two parents who had an affair long ago announce their intention to marry, the characters are set on course of forward motion as they deal with the impending marriage. Great dialogue, although it took me a little while to get into the British cadence [...]

    13. A book written (almost) entirely in dialogue: sounds like just the kind of thing I'd like. Also: don't mind a bit of nattering among the upper classes. But these people; dear god; so narrow and bleak. It was just too harsh for me.

    14. Read this back in grad school, even wrote a paper on it, though I can't recall the story (or my literary criticism--ha!). Will read again and then review.

    15. Edward St. Auben's more decorous forefather. Too decorous. All that insight into character, adds up to? A pleasant read for fans of Pym, Brookner et al. Dostoevsky it ain't.

    16. While the prose is interesting the title really captures it. I didn't couldn't finish it because there was nothing there.

    17. after using up all my renews on this library book, while only making it halfway through (and people this is not a long book), i decided to call it quits. if i were smarter i might have liked this more, but i'm not, so i didn't.

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